September 2019 Diversity Calendar

September bring autumn, and the leaves of change. So it’s a great time to inspire your people to be more aware and respectful of our differences – and similarities.

Here you’ll find our diversity calendar for September 2019, featuring 7 events and multicultural holidays. Some might impact the workplace, while others are a time to celebrate diverse groups. See our Online Diversity Calendar™ to see all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get helpful inclusion tips for your employees.

National Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15-October 15

Leading our September multicultural calendar is National Hispanic Heritage Month. Launched in 1968 as National Hispanic Heritage Week, the celebration includes September 15 and 16, the independence days for Central American nations and Mexico, respectively. In 1988, the period was expanded to National Hispanic Heritage Month.

Each year the National Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers and the Hispanic Foundation select a theme for the month, and commission a poster to reflect that theme. An important part of respecting Hispanics is being aware of communication differences, as explored in this training video on cross cultural communication.

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September 2, 2019 – Hindu : Ganesh Chaturthi

September multicultural diversity
This Hindu festival is a key diversity holiday in Sept. 2019. It’s celebrated in honour of the elephant-headed god, Ganesha, usually in August or September. The festival generally lasts ten days, and is also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi or Vinayaka Chavithi. For more religious holidays, see our 2020 Interfaith Calendar

 

September 16 – Mexico : Independence Day (El Día de Independencia)

On September 16, 1810, in the town of Dolores in the province of Guanajuato, a handful of people were summoned by a parish priest to take up arms against the Spanish colonial government. This began the fight for independence that ended 350 years of Spanish rule. Celebrated by people of Mexican origin throughout the world, this is a day when Mexican Americans often hang Mexican flags at their homes.

 

September 20 – Black American : Ursula Burns

Multicultural Events Sept 2019
‘I’m a black lady from the Lower East Side of New York. Not a lot intimidates me. Believe that there are no limitations, no barriers to your success — you will be empowered and you will achieve.’

-Ursula Burns

Diversity events include the birthdays of diversity leaders, such as Ursula M. Burns (September 20, 1958 – ). Burns is an American business executive, and the first black woman CEO to head a Fortune 500 company. In 2014, Forbes rated her the 22nd most powerful woman in the world.

 

September 20 – Women : HeForShe

HeForShe is a solidarity campaign for the advancement of gender equality, initiated by the United Nations. Founded on September 20th, 2014, it’s backed by a number of celebrities, notably actress Emma Watson.

Its goal is to achieve equality by encouraging all genders as agents of change and take action against negative stereotypes and behaviors, faced by people with feminine personalities/genders. Sexual harassment prevention training is key to gender equality.

 

September 25 – People with Disabilities : Christopher Reeve (1952-2004)

Christopher Reeve was an actor, including starring in the hist Superman, as well as acting in 17 feature films, a dozen TV movies, and more than 150 plays. His career was cut short after an equestrian accident. Reeve landed head first, fracturing the uppermost vertebrae in his spine, instantly paralyzing him from the neck down. After a grueling effort to regain his ability to breathe and speak, Reeve became an advocate for research on healing spinal cord injuries. He became Chairman of the American Paralysis Association and Vice Chairman of the National Organization on Disability. He also became a national spokesperson for and raised funds in support of stem cell research.

 

September 30, 2019 – Jewish : Rosh Hashanah (New Year) (9/30-10/1)

September multicultural holidays

Rounding out our September 2019 diversity calendar is Rosh Hashanah. Like most Jewish holidays, it begins at sundown the evening before the first (full) day of the holiday. Rosh Hashanah signifies the beginning of the Days of Awe, a period of serious reflection about the past year and the year to come. This period, which continues until Yom Kippur, is a time for asking forgiveness from both God and other people, and committing oneself to live a better life in the year to come.

To find out more multicultural holidays and events, see our Online Diversity Calendar™ to enjoy all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get helpful inclusion tips for your employees.

August 2019 Diversity Calendar

 

August 4, 2019 – Black American : Barack Obama

“The world respects us not just for our arsenal; it respects us for our diversity and our openness and the way we respect every faith.” -Barack Obama

Barack Hussein Obama II (1961- ) is an American politician who served as the 44th President of the United States from 2009 to 2017. He was the first Black American to assume the presidency. Obama promoted inclusiveness for LGBT Americans. His administration filed briefs that urged the Supreme Court to strike down same-sex marriage bans as unconstitutional (United States v. Windsor and Obergefell v. Hodges). Obama left office in January 2017 with a 60% approval rating and currently resides in Washington, D.C.

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August 9, 2019 – United Nations : International Day of the World’s Indigenous People

First proclaimed by the U.N. General Assembly in 1994, this is a day to celebrate the unique cultures of indigenous peoples around the world.

 

August 10, 2019 – Islamic : The Hajj (8/10-8/14)

The Hajj is the annual pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia. All Muslims who are able are required to make the pilgrimage at least once in their lifetime. The Hajj is a time for reflection and celebration, when more than two million Muslims from around the world gather together to celebrate their faith. The culmination of the Hajj is the three-day festival of Eid al-Adha (The Feast of Sacrifice), the most important feast of the Muslim calendar.

 

August 24, 2019 – People with Disabilities : Marlee Matlin

‘It was ability that mattered, not disability, which is a word I’m not crazy about using.’ -Marlee Matlin

Marlee Beth Matlin (born August 24, 1965) is an American actress, author and activist. She won the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for Children of a Lesser God, to date the only deaf performer to have won the award. Matlin is a prominent member of the National Association of the Deaf. In recognition of her philanthropic work and her advocacy for the inclusion of people with disabilities, Matlin received the 2016 Morton E. Ruderman Award in Inclusion, given to one individual whose work excels at promoting disability inclusion.

 

August 26, 2019 – Italian American : Geraldine Ferraro (1935-2011)

Lawyer and politician. Ferraro was the first woman and the first Italian American to run on a major party national ticket. In 1984, she ran as Walter Mondale’s vice presidential running mate on the Democratic Party ticket in the presidential election. She served as the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights under the Clinton Administration. Ferraro was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1994.

 

August 26, 2019 – United States : Women’s Equality Day

A law passed by Congress in 1974 sets this day aside to mark the certification in 1920 of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution. The 19th Amendment prohibits discrimination in voting based on gender.

 

August 31, 2019 – Islamic : Islamic New Year (Hijri)

This begins the first day of Muharram of the new year 1441 based on the Islamic lunar calendar. Recognizing the festival/holiday: any sweet dessert is an appropriate gift. Muslims do not drink alcoholic beverages.

Enjoy a head start on next month, when you view our September 2019 Diversity Calendar. 

 

July 2019 Diversity Calendar

July is the peak of summer, and thus a great time for a sunny celebration of diversity. That makes July a wonderful time to be more aware – and appreciative – of our wonderful differences and similarities.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events and holidays in July 2019, from our Online Diversity Calendar. These provide a terrific opportunity to say “we’re different and – together – we are awesome.”

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July 2 – Black American : Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993)

Civil rights leader and Supreme Court justice. Marshall was head of the legal services division of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People from 1938 to 1962.  He thus led the legal effort to advance the civil rights of all Americans, particularly those belonging to minority groups. His most famous victory was the 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, which ended racial segregation in public schools.

 

July 6 – Mexican : Frida Kahlo (1907-1954)

Painter. Kahlo was born in the outskirts of Mexico City three years before the beginning of the Mexican Revolution. She was one of the most individualistic painters of the first half of the twentieth century. Known for her distinctive self-portraits filled with rich colors and symbolic imagery, Kahlo expressed in form and color her innermost feelings and states of mind.

 

July 6 – Tibetan : 14th Dalai Lama (1935 – )

The 14th Dalai Lama, born 6 July 1935, is the current Dalai Lama. He assumed full temporal (political) duties on 17 November 1950, at the age of 15, after the People’s Republic of China’s invasion of Tibet. During the 1959 Tibetan uprising, the Dalai Lama fled to India, where he currently lives as a refugee. The 14th Dalai Lama received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. He has traveled the world and spoken about many topics. Although in exile from his home in Tibet, he remains a prominent political figure for the people of Tibet.

 

July 14, 2019 – France : Bastille Day

This celebrates the fall of the Bastille prison, marking the beginning of the French Revolution in 1789. The revolution led to the end of monarchial rule and the creation of a French Republic. Given their French heritage, many Louisiana ‘parishes,’ hold Bastille Day festivals featuring Cajun food, music, and dance. These include New Orleans and Kaplan, sometimes called ‘the most Cajun place on earth.’

 

July 18 – United Nations : Nelson Mandela International Day

In November 2009, the United Nations General Assembly declared Nelson Mandela’s birthday, July 18, to be Nelson Mandela International Day. The UN made the declaration, in recognition of his humanitarian achievements, and his contribution to racial reconciliation, democracy, and peace throughout the world.

 

July 20 – People with Disabilities: First Special Olympics Games (1968)

On this date in 1968, the first Special Olympics opened at Soldier Field in Chicago. Founded by Eunice Kennedy Shriver, it’s an athletic competition for children and adults with cognitive disabilities.  The competitions are held every two years, alternating between summer and winter games. The World Summer Games are held in the year before the regular Olympics. For more information, see our disability awareness training videos.

 

July 26 – People with Disabilities: Americans with Disabilities Act (1990)

Signed into law on this date, the ADA is a milestone of U.S. civil rights legislation. It protects people with disabilities from discrimination in the areas of employment, transportation, and public accommodation. The law requires a wide range of public and private establishments to make new and renovated facilities accessible to people with disabilities, and ‘readily achievable’ changes to existing facilities in order to increase accessibility.

To find out about more multicultural events and holidays, check out our August diversity calendar or our diversity holiday calendar for 2019

 

 

June 2019 Diversity Calendar

June brings the colors of summer, and thus it’s a great time to celebrate a rainbow of diversity. That makes it an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our wonderful differences and similarities.

To help you, here are 7 diversity holidays in June 2019, from our Online Diversity Calendar. These events need respectful scheduling – or just give the chance to shout out to specific diversity groups.

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LGBT Pride Month

On June 11, 1999, President William J. Clinton issued a presidential proclamation designating June as LGBT Pride Month. The date marked the 30th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising and the birth of the modern LGBT civil rights movement. Every year, an International Pride Theme is chosen at the InterPrice Annual Conference. Be sure to view Anyone Can Be an Ally, our most popular LGBT training video.

 

June 2 – United States : Granting of Citizenship to Native Americans (1924)

On this day, Congress extended the rights of citizenship to all Native Americans born in the United States. Previously, only part of the Native American population had been granted citizenship through treaties, statutes, naturalization, and service in the armed forces.

 

June 3 – LGBTQ+ : Anderson Cooper

“I’m gay, always have been, always will be, and I couldn’t be any more happy, comfortable with myself, and proud.”
-Anderson Cooper

Anderson Hays Cooper (June 3, 1967 – ) is an American journalist, television personality, and author. Cooper is openly gay; according to The New York Times, he is ‘the most prominent openly-gay journalist on American television.’ Apple CEO Tim Cook turned to Cooper for advice before he subsequently made the decision to publicly come out as gay.

 

June 9, 2019 – United States : Puerto Rican Day Parade

Since 1958, New York and other major cities have held parades on the second Sunday in June to celebrate the contributions of the Puerto Rican people to history. The parades feature floats, singers, and dancers in colorful costumes. They’re similar to St. Patrick’s Day, Italian, and Polish parades that have been held for decades in cities throughout the country.

June 19 – Black American : Juneteenth

This commemorates the emancipation of all slaves in Texas by the Union general Gordon Grange. As news of the Emancipation Proclamation issued in January moved westward, he announced on this day that, ‘The people of Texas are informed that in accord with a Proclamation of the Executive of the United States all slaves are free . . . .’ This is a time for various celebrations in African-American communities, including speeches, rallies, and displays of art and music. For more information, visit Juneteenth.

 

June 25 – Hispanic American : Sonia Sotomayor

‘In every position that I’ve been in, there have been naysayers who don’t believe I’m qualified or who don’t believe I can do the work. And I feel a special responsibility to prove them wrong.’ 

-Sonia Sotomayor

Sonia Maria Sotomayor (born June 25, 1954) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving since August 2009. She is the Supreme Court’s first justice of Hispanic descent, first Latina and third woman.

June 27 – People with Disabilities : Helen Keller (1880-1968)

“Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content.”

– Helen Keller

Author and educator. Left deaf and blind by illness at the age of 19 months, Helen Keller learned to speak and then to read and write Braille with the help of her remarkable teacher, Annie Sullivan. After graduating cum laude from Radcliffe College in 1904, she devoted her life to writing and social activism, particularly in aid of people with one or both of her disabilities. Her extraordinary achievements made her an international heroine and an inspiration to millions.

To find out about more multicultural events and holidays, check out our July diversity calendar or our diversity holiday calendar for 2019

 

July 2018 Diversity Calendar

Our July 2018 Diversity Calendar highlights a number of events that call for respectful scheduling, as well as multicultural holidays presenting opportunities for awareness and inclusion. Here you’ll find 7 key events in July: for a complete list, see our online diversity calendar.

Black: Thurgood Marshall – July 2

Thurgood Marshall

Civil rights leader and Supreme Court justice. As head of the legal services division of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People from 1938 to 1962, Thurgood Marshall led the legal effort to advance the civil rights of all Americans, particularly those belonging to minority groups. His most famous victory was the 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka ending racial segregation in public schools. He continued to work for civil rights and equal opportunity as a judge most notably as the first Black American associate justice of the Supreme Court.

Tibetan: 14th Dalai Lama – July 6

Dalai LamaThe

14th Dalai Lama, born 6 July 1935, is the current Dalai Lama. Dalai Lamas are important monks of the Gelug school, the newest school of Tibetan Buddhism. During the 1959 Tibetan uprising, the Dalai Lama fled to India, where he currently lives as a refugee. The 14th Dalai Lama received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. He has traveled the world and has spoken about the welfare of Tibetans, environment, economics, women’s rights, non-violence, interfaith dialogue, physics, astronomy, Buddhism and science, cognitive neuroscience, reproductive health, and sexuality, along with various Mahayana and Vajrayana topics.

Mexican: Frida Kahlo – July 6

Frida KahloPainter. Born in Coyoacán on the outskirts of Mexico City three years before the beginning of the Mexican Revolution, Frida Kahlo was one of the most individualistic painters of the first half of the twentieth century. Known for her distinctive self-portraits filled with rich colors and symbolic imagery, Kahlo expressed in form and color on canvas her innermost feelings and states of mind. One of her self-portraits, The Frame, was purchased by the Louvre—the museum’s first purchase of a work by a twentieth-century Mexican artist.

France: Bastille Day – July 14

Bastille Day

This celebrates the fall of the Bastille prison, marking the beginning of the French Revolution in 1789 and the eventual end of monarchial rule and the creation of a French Republic.

South African: Nelson Mandela – July 18

Nelson Mandela

Anti-apartheid activist, lawyer, politician, humanitarian, and first Black president of South Africa. (See Nelson Mandela, Nelson Mandela International Day, and Reconciliation Day.)

Disabled: Americans with Disabilities Act  – July 26

Americans with Disabilities

Signed into law on this date, this milestone of U.S. civil rights legislation protects people with disabilities from discrimination in the areas of employment, transportation, and public accommodation. The law requires a wide range of public and private establishments to make new and renovated facilities accessible to people with disabilities and to make “readily achievable” changes to existing facilities in order to increase accessibility.

Jewish: Milton Friedman July 31

Milton Friedman

Economist. Awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1976, Milton Friedman was one of the most influential economists of the twentieth century, making major contributions to the fields of macroeconomics, microeconomics, economic history, and statistics. Friedman served on President Reagan’s Economic Policy Advisory Board and in 1988 was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

These are only 7 diversity events for July 2018. For a complete list, plus tips for inclusion, see our web-based diversity calendar.

Workplace Diversity and Mental Health

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, so it’s a good time be aware of and more inclusive of 20% of your workforce and customers.

That’s right, 20%! About 1 in 5 adults have a mental health condition. That’s over 40 million Americans, or more than the populations of 20 US states combined!

The High Cost of Poor Mental Health – the cost for business is huge. A study of 10 major companies revealed depression is the #1 most expensive employee health condition. The total economic burden of depression is more than $210 billion per year.

18% of Employees – In a recent survey, nearly 18% of US workers said they had “experienced symptoms of a mental health disorder in the previous month.” The most common disorders are depression, stress and anxiety, and substance abuse.

The solution? Incorporate mental illness into your organization’s diversity definition. Here’s why:

Mental Health as Diversity  – The definition of diversity is: “the state or fact of being diverse, difference, unlikeness.” People differ in race, religion, heritage, sexual orientation and more. They also differ in health: everyone’s health is different.

Include the 20% – Another definition of diversity is “the inclusion of individuals representing more than one national origin, color, religion, socioeconomic stratum, sexual orientation, etc.” It certainly makes good business sense to be inclusive of 20% of the population.

Awareness, Respect and Inclusion – The goal of a diversity initiative is awareness, respect and inclusion, in that order. Be aware of differences. Respectful differences. And be inclusive. Get tips on how in this upcoming new video series on workplace mental health.

Welcome and Destigmatize – Inclusion means welcoming all people, from all ethnicities, genders, sexual orientations, age, religion, etc. It also means welcoming people with disabilities – including mental and cognitive. Together we can work towards improving the lives of those affected, and ending the stigma and discrimination that surrounds mental illness and disorders.

Watch Your Language – For corporate mental health awareness, one starting point is to avoid hurtful language. I’ve suffered from mental illness, and it’s quite hurtful when people use my diagnosis as an adjective. Avoid phrases such as “he’s totally ADHD,” “she was acting so bipolar,” or “that’s schizo.”

Shout Out – Another option is to give shout outs to famous leaders with mental health or learning disorders. From US presidents to Fortune 500 CEOs, from movie stars to famous musicians, plenty of famous people have suffered from mood or cognitive illness.

Wellness Benefits – What’s the benefit of including corporate mental health programs in your training? If a business runs a factory, it makes good sense to keep its machinery in good order. People are even more important than machines, so it makes good business sense to keep your human resources running at peak performance.

Wellness ROI – Workplaces that make the effort and investment in corporate mental wellness, to ensure their employees are healthy – mind, body and spirit – reap tremendous ROI. Some 80 percent of employees treated for mental health problems report improvements in productivity and jobs satisfaction, according to the Center for Workplace Mental Health. And it’s just a lot more productive and enjoyable to have happy, focused employees.

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