April 2019 Diversity Calendar

For the most current events, see our April 2020 Diversity Calendar

April is a time when many traditions celebrate spring, and also features Celebrate Diversity Month. So April is a great time to inspire your employees and students to be more aware – and appreciative – of our differences and similarities.

Below you’ll find 7 multicultural events and diversity holidays in April 2019. Some events might impact work schedules; others simply provide a great opportunity to celebrate specific diversity groups. For a complete list, see our interactive online diversity calendar.

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April, 2019 – Celebrate Diversity Month

Launched in 2004, Celebrate Diversity Month is featured each April to recognize and honor the nation’s diversity. Celebrate diversity – and boost awareness and inclusion – with our online diversity training!

The purpose is to help people from all walks of life gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of each other. From Allstate to TIAA, from the US Army to US Postal Service, Celebrate Diversity Month is widely recognized and celebrated by leading workplaces nationwide. This multicultural diversity event is not yet a federally-recognized theme month. 

 

April 1 – LGBTQ+ : Rachel Maddow

Diversity Events Calendar April

Rachel Anne Maddow (born April 1, 1973) is an American television host, liberal political commentator and author. Maddow became the first openly gay anchor to host a major prime-time news program in the United States.

 

April 4 – Black American : Maya Angelou (1928-2014)

Poet, writer, civil rights activist. Maya Angelou was a Renaissance woman whose versatility was reflected in the many roles she excelled in during her lifetime: poet, writer, journalist, actress, dancer, singer, educator, director, producer and civil rights activist. Maya Angelou received the country’s highest civilian honor when President Barack Obama named her a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2010.

 

April 8, 2019 – Buddhist : Buddha’s Birth

Siddhartha Gautama, who became known as Buddha or ‘enlightened one,’ was an Indian prince who left his family at the age of 29 to seek the truth of life. After years of wandering, meditation, and self-denial, he attained the enlightenment he sought at a place now called Buddha Gaya or Bodh Gaya. The religion he founded spread throughout central and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and Korea, and has also attracted followers in the West. Find out more about how religion impacts the workplace.

 

April 20, 2019 – Jewish : Passover (first day of 8-day observance)

April Diversity Calendar

Observed for eight days, this holiday celebrates the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt. The celebration of Passover, a spring festival commemorating freedom and new life, begins the previous evening with a Seder, a meal during which the story of Passover is read from the Haggadah. Jews observing the holiday abstain from eating any foods with leavening, such as bread, cake, and donuts. Before arranging any event involving food, check to see if invitees are following a special Passover diet.

 

April 21, 2019 – Christian : Easter

This religious holiday celebrates the resurrection of Jesus after he was crucified and died in Jerusalem. Jesus’ suffering and death on the cross, followed by his resurrection, is central to Christian faith. Easter is a joyous holiday, since it marks for Christians the fulfillment of the Biblical prophecy of the coming of the Messiah. In addition to its religious significance, Easter is also celebrated as a spring holiday with themes of rebirth, gathering with family and friends, and sharing special foods.

 

April 26, 2019 – Native American : Gathering of Nations Powwow

This three-day multicultural event, held annually at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, is the largest powwow in North America. More than 500 tribes from Canada and the United States participate in this annual celebration of American Indian culture. It features drum groups and ceremonial singing, chanting, dancing in traditional dress, and more. The Gathering of Nations organization seeks to promote the traditions and culture of the American Indian people in the most positive manner possible, and dispel stereotypes created about Native Americans.

Get a head start on next month, with our May 2020 Diversity Calendar. To discover more multicultural holidays and events, see our 2020 Diversity Calendar.

 

November 2018 Diversity Calendar

Our November 2018 Diversity Calendar features a diverse array of multicultural holidays calling for respectful scheduling, as well as opportunities for celebrating awareness and inclusion. Here you’ll find 7 key events in November: for a complete list, see our online diversity calendar.

According to a study by Harvard University, diversity training usually fails unless awareness and inclusion is a daily practice. So be sure to put these events on your work calendar.

 

Native American Heritage Month

Native Americans include hundreds of different tribes, speaking approximately 250 languages. President George H. W. Bush in August 1990 designated November as National American Indian Heritage Month. In his proclamation for 1996, President William J. Clinton noted, “Throughout our history, American Indian and Alaska Native peoples have been an integral part of the American character. Against all odds, America’s first peoples have endured, and they remain a vital cultural, political, social, and moral presence.”

National Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes Awareness Month

National Diabetes Month is observed every November so individuals, health care professionals, organizations, and communities across the country can bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. In the United States, some 29.1 million people – or 9.3% of the population – have diabetes, including 8.1 million people who are undiagnosed.

Movember

Movember is an annual event involving the growing of moustaches during the month of November. This is to raise awareness of men’s health issues, such as prostate cancer, testicular cancer and men’s suicide. Movember aims to increase early cancer detection, diagnosis and effective treatments, and ultimately reduce the number of preventable deaths. Besides annual check-ups, the Movember Foundation encourages men to be aware of family history of cancer and to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

November 1 Mexico : Day of the Dead

November multicultural holidays include this holiday, with roots in two traditions: the Christian observance of All Saints and All Souls Day, and two Aztec festivals honoring the souls of the dead. Flowers, foods, and favorite possessions celebrate the memory of deceased loved ones and to welcome their visiting souls. The holiday is celebrated with family and community gatherings, music, and feasting, and the festivity of its observance acknowledges death as an integral part of life.

November 1 LGBTQ+ : Tim Cook

Tim Cook

A key diversity event for November 2018 is the birthday of Timothy Donald Cook (November 1, 1960 – ), an American business executive, industrial engineer, and developer. In 2014, he became the first Chief Executive of a Fortune 500 company to publicly identify as gay. Cook is the Chief Executive Officer of Apple Inc., previously serving as the company’s Chief Operating Officer, under its founder Steve Jobs.

November 18 – Hispanic American : Roberto Goizueta

Roberto Goizueta

Roberto Críspulo Goizueta Cantera (November 18, 1931 – October 18, 1997) was a Cuban-American businessman, who was the first Hispanic CEO of a Fortune 500 company. Goizueta was Chairman, Director, and Chief Executive Officer of The Coca-Cola Company from August 1980 until his death in 1997. During his tenure, the Coca-Cola brand became the best-known trademark in the world.

November 30 Shirley Chisholm: Black American

Shirley Chisholm

Shirley Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to the U.S. Congress in 1968, where she served seven terms. While in Congress, Chisholm spoke out for civil rights, women’s rights, and the poor, and against the Vietnam War. In 1972 Chisholm became a Democratic candidate for President of the United States, the first major party Black American candidate for the U.S. presidency.

Find out about next month in our December 2018 diversity calendar. And see our online diversity calendar, to find out key diversity events in the coming months, get inclusion tips, and more.

April 2018 Diversity Calendar

Here are 7 highlights from our April 2018 Diversity Calendar; for a complete list of 2018 diversity events, plus dozens of inclusion tips, see our interactive Online Calendar.

Christian: Easter – date varies

April 2018 Diversity Event: Easter

Easter is one of the most important holiday days in the world’s largest religion. It celebrates the resurrection of Jesus, after he was crucified and died in Jerusalem. Easter is a joyous holiday, marking for Christians the fulfillment of the Biblical prophecy of the coming of the Messiah. In addition to its religious significance, Easter is celebrated as a spring holiday with themes of rebirth, gathering with family and friends, and sharing special foods.

Black: Maya Angelou – April 4

April Multicultural Events: Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou was a Renaissance woman. Her versatility was reflected in the many roles she excelled in: poet, writer, journalist, actress, dancer, singer, educator, director, producer, and civil rights activist. She is perhaps best known for her poetry and autobiographies, including “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.” In 2010, Angelou received the country’s highest civilian honor when President Barack Obama named her a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Scottish American: Tartan Day – April 6

Diversity Calendar Scottish American Tartan Day

Our April 2018 multicultural calendar includes Tartan Day, established by an act of Congress in 1998 to recognize the role Scottish Americans played in the founding of the nation. It also acknowledges the many contributions that have been made by people of Scottish ancestry, including Alexander Hamilton, Andrew Carnegie, Woodrow Wilson and more.

Jewish: Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust – date varies

Jewish Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust April 2018

This eight-day-long observance runs from the Sunday on or before through the Sunday after Yom Hashoah, the Jewish observance of Holocaust Memorial Day. It’s a time of civic commemorations to remember the Holocaust victims, and educational programs to teach the lessons of the Holocaust. The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., sets a theme for each year’s programs.

Buddhist: Buddha’s Birth – April 8

April Religious Observances Buddha's Birth

This is key diversity holiday in April 2018. Siddhartha Gautama, who became known as Buddha or “enlightened one,” was an Indian prince who left his family at the age of 29 to seek the truth of life. After years of wandering, meditation, and self-denial, he attained the enlightenment. The religion he founded spread throughout central and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and Korea, and has also attracted followers in the West.

French: David Servan-Schreiber – April 21

David Servan-Schreiber

A psychiatrist and neuroscientist, Servan-Schreiber was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor at the age of 31. He created his own treatment program of integrative approaches to lifestyle and health, keeping the cancer in check for 15 years. His books include Healing Without Freud or Prozac: Natural Approaches to Curing Stress, Anxiety and Depression (2003) and Anticancer: A New Way of Life (2007), a revolutionary approach to the understanding and treatment of cancer.

Native American: Gathering of Nations – date varies

Native American: Gathering of NationsThis three-day event, held annually at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, is the largest powwow in North America. More than 500 tribes from Canada and the United States come every year to participate in this celebration of American Indian culture. The Gathering of Nations organization seeks to dispel stereotypes, and promote the traditions and culture of the American Indian people in a positive manner.

Find out what you missed last month, in our March 2018 diversity calendar. Or get a preview of next month with our Multicultural Events Calendar for May 2018.

November 2017 Diversity Calendar

by Logan Arlen

The November 2017 diversity calendar features a wide array of diversity events that span from the triumphs of Black Americans to the struggles of the transgender community.  It’s also National Native American Heritage Month, giving people in the US the opportunity to discover more about these historic people. Learning about the culture and customs of others is essential to truly respecting them.

See what diversity dates you missed last month in our October 2017 Blog post. Check out the full November diversity calendar here

Barack Obama

Barack Obama

One of the most famous Black Americans in history and a symbol for our progress, Barack Obama is one of the most influential and respected men alive. November marks the day Obama was elected to become President of the United States, becoming the first Black American to ever be elected to the highest office. He is an iconic role model in the black community, and an inspiration for young men and women, proving that you can do anything no matter your skin color.

Transgender Day of Rememberance

Transgender Day of Remembrance

Each year since its creation in 1999, the Transgender Day of Remembrance memorializes those who have been slain due to their sexual orientation. TDoR seeks to bring attention to the ongoing violence towards the transgender community. It’s celebrated in more than 20 countries around the world, and helps to shed light on the plight of the transgendered people. It’s essential for awareness these issues of violence affect not only the transgender community, but the entire LGBTQ community.

National Native American Heritage Month

National Native American Heritage Month

Our Diversity Calendar for November 2017 features this monthly theme. Established by President George H. Bush in 1990, National American Indian Heritage Month gives a platform to indigenous Americans to share their traditions and cultures with the rest of the country. Another aim of this month is to extend opportunities for dialog between government and indigenous people,  address concerns and seeks solutions.

AllSaintsDay

All Saints Day

This observance celebrates all saints, both known and unknown. This holiday stems from the belief in a spiritual bond between the living on Earth and spirits in heaven. Catholics believe the day commemorates those who have attained the beatific vision in Heaven. The main element of the holiday revolves around “giving God solemn thanks for the lives and deaths of his saints,” and those who have personally led the faith in Jesus.

 

Veterans Day

Veterans Day/Armistice Day/ Remembrance Day

Veterans Day is an official US holiday to honor military veterans. Other countries celebrate Remembrance Day or Armistice Day as a mark of the anniversary of the end of World War 1. Veterans Day is different from Memorial Day in that it honors all Armed Forces veterans, while Memorial Day only honors those who died in service. Many business and government functions close during the holiday to show respect to the men and women who risk their lives to protect ours.

Mawlid

Mawlid

Otherwise known as Eid Milad Un Nabi, “Birth of the Prophet” is the observance of the Islamic prophet Muhammad’s Birthday. There are debates on the correct date of the holiday between Sunni Muslims and Shi’a Muslims. They believe the date is on the twelfth of Rabi’al-Awwal , or the seventeenth of Rabi’al-Awwal , respectively. Regardless of the actual date, this celebration is widely observed by Muslims. To learn more about Muslims and their beliefs, view cultural awareness and respect video.

Be sure to check out next month’s diversity calendar for a preview of November’s events. For a complete list of 2017 events, see our online diversity calendar.

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