March 2019 Diversity Calendar

March is the advent of spring, and the hope of colorful flowers under a rainbow of diversity. That makes March an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our wonderful differences and similarities.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events and holidays in March 2019 that require respectful scheduling – or just provide an opportunity to shout out and say “we’re different and – together – we are awesome.”

 

March 2019 – Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month is an annual observance of the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. It is celebrated during March in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia, corresponding with International Women’s Day on March 8. The theme for 2019 is “Visionary Women: Champions of Peace & Nonviolence.” This makes March an ideal time to support the #metoo movement and promoting training for sexual harassment prevention.

 

March 1 – Hispanic American/Women: Geisha Williams

Geisha J. Williams (born 1961 or 1962) is an American businesswoman. She became the first female Hispanic CEO of a Fortune 500 company on March 1, 2017, when she became president and CEO of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). Williams was born in Cuba, and emigrated to the U.S. with her family. She joined PG&E in 2007.

 

March 6 – Black American/Muslim : Shaquille O’Neal

March 2019 Diversity Calendar

Shaquille O’Neal Shaquille Rashaun O’Neal (born March 6, 1972), nicknamed ‘Shaq’, is an American retired professional basketball. Widely considered one of the greatest players in NBA history, he is a practicing Muslim. O’Neal was raised by a Baptist mother and a Muslim stepfather. In a 2010 interview he confirmed his plans to undertake the Muslim pilgrimage, called Hajj. Discover more about how religion impacts the workplace.

 

March 6, 2019 – Christian : Ash Wednesday

This marks the beginning of Lent, a 40-day period of prayer and fasting preceding Easter Sunday. It is observed in memory of Jesus’ 40 days of fasting in the desert. In the early centuries of Christianity, there were strict requirements for fasting during the period of preparation for Easter. Although these rules have been relaxed in the Western church, many Roman Catholics and Protestants choose to give up a favorite food or activity during Lent.

 

March 21, 2019 – Hindu : Holi

Multicultural Calendar March 2019

Holi, the festival of colors, celebrates the coming of spring throughout India and the new harvest of the winter crop. It is celebrated over two days. Newly harvested grains, coconuts, and sweets are thrown into the fire as offerings, followed by singing and dancing around the bonfire.

 

March 25 – United Nations : International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

This is a day to honor and remember the more than 15 million men, women and children who were victims of the 400-year transatlantic slave trade, one of the darkest and most tragic chapters in human history. It is also a time to raise awareness about the dangers of racism and prejudice in today’s world.

 

March 26 – Italian American : Nancy Pelosi

Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is an American politician. She was the first woman to become Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, attaining the highest rank of any female politician in U.S. history. She served as the 52nd House Speaker from 2007 to 2011, the only woman to do so. As Speaker, she became the first woman and the first Italian-American to lead a major party in Congress.

To discover more multicultural holidays and events, see our April diversity calendar or our diversity holiday calendar for 2019

May 2018 Diversity Calendar

May 2018 offers a number of diversity events that require respectful scheduling, as well as multicultural holidays offering opportunities for awareness and inclusion. Here’s a selection from our online diversity calendar.

Jewish American Heritage Month

Jewish American Heritage Month

Leading our May multicultural calendar, Jewish American Heritage Month was established in 2006 by President George W. Bush, designating the month of May. “During Jewish American Heritage Month, we celebrate the rich history of the Jewish people in America and honor the great contributions they have made to our country,” Bush said. “As a nation of immigrants, the United States is better and stronger because Jewish people from all over the world have chosen to become American citizens.”

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

Launched in 1979 as Asian Heritage Week, it established by congressional proclamation. From then until 1993, the period for recognizing Asian/Pacific Americans was created by congressional proclamation each year. President George H. W. Bush, on October 23, 1992, signed legislation into law that made May of each year Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month.

 

Older Americans Month

Older Americans Month

Older Americans Month was established by presidential proclamation to honor the contributions of older Americans to society. The 2018 theme, Engage at Every Age, emphasizes that you are never too old (or young) to take part in activities that can enrich your physical, mental, and emotional well-being. It also celebrates the many ways in which older adults make a difference in our communities.

LGBT: Keith Harring – May 4

Keith Haring

Pop artist. Haring created a wide variety of public art, such as subway drawings of animals and human images and murals, including the first mural in a school yard on New York City’s Lower East Side and a mural on the Berlin Wall. In 1987, he used his art to support campaigns for AIDS awareness and created the Keith Haring Foundation to contribute to a wide variety of social concerns. This diversity event provides an excellent opportunity for LGBTQ+ inclusion.

Mexican American: Cinco de Mayo – May 5

Cinco de Mayo

The French attempted to occupy Mexico and make it part of its empire under Napoleon III, probably in an attempt to offset the growing power of the United States. On the morning of May 5, 1862, under General Ignacio Zaragoza, 5,000 ill-equipped Mestizo and Zapotec Indians defeated the French army in what came to be known as the Batalla de Puebla, which later was called Cinco de Mayo. The holiday tends to be celebrated more among Mexican-Americans, rather than in Mexico.

Islamic: Ramadan – floating holiday*

Ramadan 2018

*date varies annually: see our web-based Diversity Calendar for 2018 date

A key diversity holiday for May 2018, Ramadan begins the first day of the Islamic month of Ramadan, a month of fasting and the holiest month of the Muslim year. The fast of Ramadan is one of the Five Pillars of Islam, and mandatory for every Muslim who has reached puberty except those who are ill, pregnant, or on a journey. During this month, no water or food may be taken from sunrise to sunset.

Black: Malcolm X – May 19

Malcolm X

Civil rights leader. Malcolm Little adopted the name Malcolm X when he joined the Nation of Islam (Black Muslims), a religious movement advocating Black separatism. He became a leading spokesman for the Muslims. In 1964 he broke with the group, rejecting racial separatism and forming his own group, the Organization of Afro-American Unity. He continued to speak out until his assassination on February 21, 1965, urging blacks to take pride in their race and to take action to claim their civil and human rights.

Find out what you may have missed last month, in our Diversity Events Calendar for April 2018.

November 2017 Diversity Calendar

by Logan Arlen

The November 2017 diversity calendar features a wide array of diversity events that span from the triumphs of Black Americans to the struggles of the transgender community.  It’s also National Native American Heritage Month, giving people in the US the opportunity to discover more about these historic people. Learning about the culture and customs of others is essential to truly respecting them.

See what diversity dates you missed last month in our October 2017 Blog post. Check out the full November diversity calendar here

Barack Obama

Barack Obama

One of the most famous Black Americans in history and a symbol for our progress, Barack Obama is one of the most influential and respected men alive. November marks the day Obama was elected to become President of the United States, becoming the first Black American to ever be elected to the highest office. He is an iconic role model in the black community, and an inspiration for young men and women, proving that you can do anything no matter your skin color.

Transgender Day of Rememberance

Transgender Day of Remembrance

Each year since its creation in 1999, the Transgender Day of Remembrance memorializes those who have been slain due to their sexual orientation. TDoR seeks to bring attention to the ongoing violence towards the transgender community. It’s celebrated in more than 20 countries around the world, and helps to shed light on the plight of the transgendered people. It’s essential for awareness these issues of violence affect not only the transgender community, but the entire LGBTQ community.

National Native American Heritage Month

National Native American Heritage Month

Our Diversity Calendar for November 2017 features this monthly theme. Established by President George H. Bush in 1990, National American Indian Heritage Month gives a platform to indigenous Americans to share their traditions and cultures with the rest of the country. Another aim of this month is to extend opportunities for dialog between government and indigenous people,  address concerns and seeks solutions.

AllSaintsDay

All Saints Day

This observance celebrates all saints, both known and unknown. This holiday stems from the belief in a spiritual bond between the living on Earth and spirits in heaven. Catholics believe the day commemorates those who have attained the beatific vision in Heaven. The main element of the holiday revolves around “giving God solemn thanks for the lives and deaths of his saints,” and those who have personally led the faith in Jesus.

 

Veterans Day

Veterans Day/Armistice Day/ Remembrance Day

Veterans Day is an official US holiday to honor military veterans. Other countries celebrate Remembrance Day or Armistice Day as a mark of the anniversary of the end of World War 1. Veterans Day is different from Memorial Day in that it honors all Armed Forces veterans, while Memorial Day only honors those who died in service. Many business and government functions close during the holiday to show respect to the men and women who risk their lives to protect ours.

Mawlid

Mawlid

Otherwise known as Eid Milad Un Nabi, “Birth of the Prophet” is the observance of the Islamic prophet Muhammad’s Birthday. There are debates on the correct date of the holiday between Sunni Muslims and Shi’a Muslims. They believe the date is on the twelfth of Rabi’al-Awwal , or the seventeenth of Rabi’al-Awwal , respectively. Regardless of the actual date, this celebration is widely observed by Muslims. To learn more about Muslims and their beliefs, view cultural awareness and respect video.

Be sure to check out next month’s diversity calendar for a preview of November’s events. For a complete list of 2017 events, see our online diversity calendar.

October 2017 Diversity Calendar

by Logan Arlen

The month of October is widely known for the peak of autumn and Halloween. But our October 2017 Diversity Calendar features celebration of inclusion events, including National Disability Employment Awareness Month, Global Diversity Awareness Month, LGBT History Month, and more.

While these are three major diversity events that span the entire month, there are many more important dates in October. To see what diversity events you missed last month look at the September’s 2017 blog post

Check out the full diversity calendar

National Disability Employment Awareness

National Disability Employment Awareness

Declared by Congress in 1988 in order to raise awareness of the contributions and needs of people with disabilities.  “Smart employers know that including different perspectives in problem-solving situations leads to better solutions,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta when NDEA was established. “Hiring employees with diverse abilities strengthens their business, increases competition and drives innovation.” This sentiment is still true today, now more than ever.

LGBT History Month

LGBT History Month

Another October 2017 diversity month theme is LGBT History Month. A Missouri high-school teacher, Rodney Wilson, first proposed the idea in 1994. Wilson chose October because it’s the anniversary of first and second March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, as well as the month in which National Coming Out Day is honored. LGBT History Month is celebrated in the United States and many countries around the world, but not all of them are in October. View our LGBT training video Anyone Can Be an Ally.

Sukkot

Jewish: Sukkot

Sukkot, or the Feast of Tabernacles, is named after the Sukkah erected and adorned with fruits and vegetables. These symbolize the temporary dwellings farmers lived in during harvest, and the dwellings Israelites lived in during their 40-year journey through the desert. Sukkot is one of the three ‘pilgrimage festivals’ during which Jews must perform a pilgrimage to the holy temple. Each day of the holiday it is required to perform a ceremony in which the Four Species are waved.

Imam W.D. Mohammed

African American/Islam: Imam W.D. Mohammed (born Wallace Dean Muhammad)

Son of the leader of the Nation of Islam, Elijah Muhammad, W.D. succeeded his father and transformed the Nation of Islam to a mainstream Islamic group from a small black separatist organization. W.D. emphasized religious and racial tolerance to his followers and opened his new group to Muslims of all races.

He also disbanded the Nation of Islam’s paramilitary force, renamed temples to “mosques” ministers to “imams”, and abolished the dress code. After several other name changes, Imam settled on the “Muslim American Community” in the 1990s.

United Nations Day

Global Event: United Nations Day

October 24th commemorates the formation of the United Nations in 1945. After the conclusion of World War II, the world banded together to create a council of nations to better the world. Franklin D. Roosevelt coined the term United Nations during WWII to describe the Allied countries at war with the Axis countries. Five of these Allied countries – The United States, United Kingdom, Soviet Union, the Republic of China, and France – became permanent members of the UN’s Security Council, who ratified the charter creating the UN.

Global Diversity Awareness Month

Global Diversity Awareness Month

Our diversity calendar for October 2017 also includes Global Diversity Awareness Month, which promotes open mindedness and celebration of differences. Building an inclusive workplace is key to increasing employee morale and productivity. Inclusion is based on ensuring everyone receives equal treatment, and understanding different cultural perspectives and values. View our global diversity training video Building the Multicultural team.

Be sure to check out next month’s diversity calendar for a preview of November’s events. For a complete list of 2017 events, see our online diversity calendar.

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