September 2019 Diversity Calendar

September bring autumn, and the leaves of change. So it’s a great time to inspire your people to be more aware and respectful of our differences – and similarities.

Here you’ll find our diversity calendar for September 2019, featuring 7 events and multicultural holidays. Some might impact the workplace, while others are a time to celebrate diverse groups. See our Online Diversity Calendar™ to see all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get helpful inclusion tips for your employees.

National Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15-October 15

Leading our September multicultural calendar is National Hispanic Heritage Month. Launched in 1968 as National Hispanic Heritage Week, the celebration includes September 15 and 16, the independence days for Central American nations and Mexico, respectively. In 1988, the period was expanded to National Hispanic Heritage Month.

Each year the National Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers and the Hispanic Foundation select a theme for the month, and commission a poster to reflect that theme. An important part of respecting Hispanics is being aware of communication differences, as explored in this training video on cross cultural communication.

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September 2, 2019 – Hindu : Ganesh Chaturthi

September multicultural diversity
This Hindu festival is a key diversity holiday in Sept. 2019. It’s celebrated in honour of the elephant-headed god, Ganesha, usually in August or September. The festival generally lasts ten days, and is also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi or Vinayaka Chavithi. For more religious holidays, see our 2020 Interfaith Calendar

 

September 16 – Mexico : Independence Day (El Día de Independencia)

On September 16, 1810, in the town of Dolores in the province of Guanajuato, a handful of people were summoned by a parish priest to take up arms against the Spanish colonial government. This began the fight for independence that ended 350 years of Spanish rule. Celebrated by people of Mexican origin throughout the world, this is a day when Mexican Americans often hang Mexican flags at their homes.

 

September 20 – Black American : Ursula Burns

Multicultural Events Sept 2019
‘I’m a black lady from the Lower East Side of New York. Not a lot intimidates me. Believe that there are no limitations, no barriers to your success — you will be empowered and you will achieve.’

-Ursula Burns

Diversity events include the birthdays of diversity leaders, such as Ursula M. Burns (September 20, 1958 – ). Burns is an American business executive, and the first black woman CEO to head a Fortune 500 company. In 2014, Forbes rated her the 22nd most powerful woman in the world.

 

September 20 – Women : HeForShe

HeForShe is a solidarity campaign for the advancement of gender equality, initiated by the United Nations. Founded on September 20th, 2014, it’s backed by a number of celebrities, notably actress Emma Watson.

Its goal is to achieve equality by encouraging all genders as agents of change and take action against negative stereotypes and behaviors, faced by people with feminine personalities/genders. Sexual harassment prevention training is key to gender equality.

 

September 25 – People with Disabilities : Christopher Reeve (1952-2004)

Christopher Reeve was an actor, including starring in the hist Superman, as well as acting in 17 feature films, a dozen TV movies, and more than 150 plays. His career was cut short after an equestrian accident. Reeve landed head first, fracturing the uppermost vertebrae in his spine, instantly paralyzing him from the neck down. After a grueling effort to regain his ability to breathe and speak, Reeve became an advocate for research on healing spinal cord injuries. He became Chairman of the American Paralysis Association and Vice Chairman of the National Organization on Disability. He also became a national spokesperson for and raised funds in support of stem cell research.

 

September 30, 2019 – Jewish : Rosh Hashanah (New Year) (9/30-10/1)

September multicultural holidays

Rounding out our September 2019 diversity calendar is Rosh Hashanah. Like most Jewish holidays, it begins at sundown the evening before the first (full) day of the holiday. Rosh Hashanah signifies the beginning of the Days of Awe, a period of serious reflection about the past year and the year to come. This period, which continues until Yom Kippur, is a time for asking forgiveness from both God and other people, and committing oneself to live a better life in the year to come.

To find out more multicultural holidays and events, see our Online Diversity Calendar™ to enjoy all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get helpful inclusion tips for your employees.

December 2018 Diversity Calendar

According to a study by Harvard University, diversity training usually fails unless awareness and inclusion is a daily practice.

Our December 2018 Diversity Calendar features a diverse array of multicultural holidays calling for respectful scheduling, as well as opportunities for celebrating awareness and inclusion. Here you’ll find 7 key events in December: for a complete list, see our online diversity calendar.

International : World AIDS Day

Also known as United Nations World AIDS Day, this day has been declared by the World Health Organization as a time to increase education and awareness of AIDS.

Jewish : Hanukkah (12/2-12/10)

A key December diversity holiday is Hanukkah. Often misunderstood as the “Jewish Christmas” since it occurs in December, it commemorates the victory of the Jewish people over the Syrian Greeks in 165 B.C.E. This victory marked the end of a three-year period of religious persecution, restored Jewish independence, and ensured the survival of monotheism (belief in one God). Hanukkah is celebrated by lighting a candle on each of the eight days of celebration. This ceremony has given the holiday the additional name of “Festival of Lights.” Hanukkah is joyfully celebrated.

United Nations : International Day of Persons with Disabilities

One of the most important diversity events in December 2018. This international observance was established to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights, and well-being of persons with disabilities. It also seeks to foster awareness of the importance of integrating persons with disabilities into every aspect of life.

Buddhist : Bodhi Day (Buddha’s Enlightenment)

Among Mahãyãna Buddhists, this holiday celebrates Buddha’s attaining understanding of the truth of existence, freeing himself from all human suffering, and finding perfect happiness. The date is based on the Japanese Buddhist calendar.

Mexico : Las Posadas (12/16-12/24)

Las Posadas, celebrated from December 16 to December 24, commemorates Mary and Joseph’s effort to find an inn, and the events associated with the birth of Jesus. The holiday takes its name from the Spanish word posadas, meaning “a dwelling.” A candlelight procession represents the star in heaven that guided the three wise men on their way. After a religious ceremony on December 24, there is a traditional celebration centering on the piñata, a decorated clay container filled with toys and candy. When the piñata is broken, the children scramble for the candy.

Christian : Christmas

Most Christians observe Christmas to celebrate the birth of Jesus, and it is celebrated as a public holiday in many countries worldwide. Christmas is a family-oriented holiday with special foods, colorful decorations, and exchanging of gifts. Families often have their own traditions, especially concerning when gifts are exchanged and what foods are served. Jehovah’s Witnesses are among those who do not celebrate this holiday.

African American, African Heritage : Kwanzaa

Another essential multicultural holiday for December is Kwanzaa. First celebrated on December 26, 1966, the festival was created in the United States by scholar and cultural activist Dr. Maulana Karenga. Patterned after harvest festivals in Africa, Kwanzaa derives its name from the Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, meaning “first fruits.” Kwanzaa decorations traditionally use a color scheme of red, black, and green.  A Pan-African holiday, Kwanzaa is also celebrated in Africa, the Caribbean, South America, and in African communities in Europe.

These are just 7 highlights from our December 2018 diversity calendar. See our online diversity calendar, to find out key diversity events in the coming months, get inclusion tips, and more.

November 2018 Diversity Calendar

Our November 2018 Diversity Calendar features a diverse array of multicultural holidays calling for respectful scheduling, as well as opportunities for celebrating awareness and inclusion. Here you’ll find 7 key events in November: for a complete list, see our online diversity calendar.

According to a study by Harvard University, diversity training usually fails unless awareness and inclusion is a daily practice. So be sure to put these events on your work calendar.

 

Native American Heritage Month

Native Americans include hundreds of different tribes, speaking approximately 250 languages. President George H. W. Bush in August 1990 designated November as National American Indian Heritage Month. In his proclamation for 1996, President William J. Clinton noted, “Throughout our history, American Indian and Alaska Native peoples have been an integral part of the American character. Against all odds, America’s first peoples have endured, and they remain a vital cultural, political, social, and moral presence.”

National Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes Awareness Month

National Diabetes Month is observed every November so individuals, health care professionals, organizations, and communities across the country can bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. In the United States, some 29.1 million people – or 9.3% of the population – have diabetes, including 8.1 million people who are undiagnosed.

Movember

Movember is an annual event involving the growing of moustaches during the month of November. This is to raise awareness of men’s health issues, such as prostate cancer, testicular cancer and men’s suicide. Movember aims to increase early cancer detection, diagnosis and effective treatments, and ultimately reduce the number of preventable deaths. Besides annual check-ups, the Movember Foundation encourages men to be aware of family history of cancer and to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

November 1 Mexico : Day of the Dead

November multicultural holidays include this holiday, with roots in two traditions: the Christian observance of All Saints and All Souls Day, and two Aztec festivals honoring the souls of the dead. Flowers, foods, and favorite possessions celebrate the memory of deceased loved ones and to welcome their visiting souls. The holiday is celebrated with family and community gatherings, music, and feasting, and the festivity of its observance acknowledges death as an integral part of life.

November 1 LGBTQ+ : Tim Cook

Tim Cook

A key diversity event for November 2018 is the birthday of Timothy Donald Cook (November 1, 1960 – ), an American business executive, industrial engineer, and developer. In 2014, he became the first Chief Executive of a Fortune 500 company to publicly identify as gay. Cook is the Chief Executive Officer of Apple Inc., previously serving as the company’s Chief Operating Officer, under its founder Steve Jobs.

November 18 – Hispanic American : Roberto Goizueta

Roberto Goizueta

Roberto Críspulo Goizueta Cantera (November 18, 1931 – October 18, 1997) was a Cuban-American businessman, who was the first Hispanic CEO of a Fortune 500 company. Goizueta was Chairman, Director, and Chief Executive Officer of The Coca-Cola Company from August 1980 until his death in 1997. During his tenure, the Coca-Cola brand became the best-known trademark in the world.

November 30 Shirley Chisholm: Black American

Shirley Chisholm

Shirley Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to the U.S. Congress in 1968, where she served seven terms. While in Congress, Chisholm spoke out for civil rights, women’s rights, and the poor, and against the Vietnam War. In 1972 Chisholm became a Democratic candidate for President of the United States, the first major party Black American candidate for the U.S. presidency.

Find out about next month in our December 2018 diversity calendar. And see our online diversity calendar, to find out key diversity events in the coming months, get inclusion tips, and more.

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