October 2019 Diversity Calendar

October heralds the wonderful colors of autumn. That makes October an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our colorful differences and similarities. Indeed, there are three major October diversity month themes below.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events in October 2019. These diversity holidays might respectful scheduling – such as Yom Kippur. Others offer an opportunity to give a shout out to diverse groups, ranging from LGBTQ+ to people with disabilities. Check out our Online Diversity Calendar™ to see all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get inclusion tips for your employees.

October 2019: Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast Cancer Awareness Month, also called National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the USA, is an annual international health campaign. It’s promoted by major breast cancer charities every October, to increase awareness of the disease, and to raise funds for research into its cause, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure. The campaign also offers information and support to those affected by breast cancer.

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Global Diversity Awareness Month

October 2019 Diversity Calendar

Another October diversity event in 2019 is Global Diversity Awareness Month. Global diversity awareness focuses on understanding differing cultural perspectives, and valuing the diverse perspectives of all people from all places. Fueled by the belief that workforce diversity is a major business advantage, global diversity awareness promotes cultural diversity training and an inclusive global environment.

 

National Disability Employment Awareness Month

Designate by President Reagan in 1988, this October diversity month seeks to enhance public awareness of those with disabilities, and encourage their full integration into the workforce. For more information, visit the U.S. Department of Labor National Disability Employment Awareness Month webpage.

 

October 9, 2019 – Jewish : Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement)

October Multicultural Events

A key October multicultural holiday is Yom Kippur. The ten days from Rosh Hashanah to Yom Kippur are known as the Days of Awe or the Days of Repentance. During this time Jews are to remind themselves of their sins, and seek forgiveness for their wrongdoings. Many Jews observe Yom Kippur, the holiest Jewish holiday, by taking no food or water from sundown the day before through sundown the following day. It is also common for Jews not to work the night before or day of Yom Kippur. For more religious holidays, see our 2020 Interfaith Calendar

 

October 10 – People with Disabilities : World Mental Health Day

World Mental Health Day is a day for global mental health education, awareness and advocacy against social stigma. It was first celebrated in 1992 at the initiative of the World Federation for Mental Health. The federation is a global mental health organization with members and contacts in more than 150 countries. Every October 10, advocates promote this annual awareness program to bring attention to mental illness, as well as promote workplace wellness training .

 

October 11 – LGBTQ+ : National Coming Out Day/March on Washington 

The key LGBTQ+ diversity event in October. On this day in 1987, saw the largest gay and lesbian gathering in history, with estimates ranging from 200,000 to 600,000 protestors. The crowd protested anti-gay discrimination, and demanded a stronger government response to the AIDS crisis.

 

October 27, 2019 – Hindu : Diwali

Diversity Holidays October 2019A major October diversity holiday, Diwali is one of the most important annual festivals in the Hindu religion. Lasting five days, Diwali encompasses a variety of festivals, celebrating various gods and goddesses, and events in their lives. Since Diwali is a ‘festival of lights,’ candles are an appropriate gift.

Get a head start, and check out our November 2019 diversity calendar. Or better yet, discover our Online Diversity Calendar™ to see all upcoming 2019/2020 diversity holidays and get inclusion tips for your employees.

June 2019 Diversity Calendar

June brings the colors of summer, and thus it’s a great time to celebrate a rainbow of diversity. That makes it an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our wonderful differences and similarities.

To help you, here are 7 diversity holidays in June 2019, from our Online Diversity Calendar. These events need respectful scheduling – or just give the chance to shout out to specific diversity groups.

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LGBT Pride Month

On June 11, 1999, President William J. Clinton issued a presidential proclamation designating June as LGBT Pride Month. The date marked the 30th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising and the birth of the modern LGBT civil rights movement. Every year, an International Pride Theme is chosen at the InterPrice Annual Conference. Be sure to view Anyone Can Be an Ally, our most popular LGBT training video.

 

June 2 – United States : Granting of Citizenship to Native Americans (1924)

On this day, Congress extended the rights of citizenship to all Native Americans born in the United States. Previously, only part of the Native American population had been granted citizenship through treaties, statutes, naturalization, and service in the armed forces.

 

June 3 – LGBTQ+ : Anderson Cooper

“I’m gay, always have been, always will be, and I couldn’t be any more happy, comfortable with myself, and proud.”
-Anderson Cooper

Anderson Hays Cooper (June 3, 1967 – ) is an American journalist, television personality, and author. Cooper is openly gay; according to The New York Times, he is ‘the most prominent openly-gay journalist on American television.’ Apple CEO Tim Cook turned to Cooper for advice before he subsequently made the decision to publicly come out as gay.

 

June 9, 2019 – United States : Puerto Rican Day Parade

Since 1958, New York and other major cities have held parades on the second Sunday in June to celebrate the contributions of the Puerto Rican people to history. The parades feature floats, singers, and dancers in colorful costumes. They’re similar to St. Patrick’s Day, Italian, and Polish parades that have been held for decades in cities throughout the country.

June 19 – Black American : Juneteenth

This commemorates the emancipation of all slaves in Texas by the Union general Gordon Grange. As news of the Emancipation Proclamation issued in January moved westward, he announced on this day that, ‘The people of Texas are informed that in accord with a Proclamation of the Executive of the United States all slaves are free . . . .’ This is a time for various celebrations in African-American communities, including speeches, rallies, and displays of art and music. For more information, visit Juneteenth.

 

June 25 – Hispanic American : Sonia Sotomayor

‘In every position that I’ve been in, there have been naysayers who don’t believe I’m qualified or who don’t believe I can do the work. And I feel a special responsibility to prove them wrong.’ 

-Sonia Sotomayor

Sonia Maria Sotomayor (born June 25, 1954) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving since August 2009. She is the Supreme Court’s first justice of Hispanic descent, first Latina and third woman.

June 27 – People with Disabilities : Helen Keller (1880-1968)

“Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content.”

– Helen Keller

Author and educator. Left deaf and blind by illness at the age of 19 months, Helen Keller learned to speak and then to read and write Braille with the help of her remarkable teacher, Annie Sullivan. After graduating cum laude from Radcliffe College in 1904, she devoted her life to writing and social activism, particularly in aid of people with one or both of her disabilities. Her extraordinary achievements made her an international heroine and an inspiration to millions.

To find out about more multicultural events and holidays, check out our July diversity calendar or our diversity holiday calendar for 2019

 

April 2019 Diversity Calendar

For the most current events, see our April 2020 Diversity Calendar

April is a time when many traditions celebrate spring, and also features Celebrate Diversity Month. So April is a great time to inspire your employees and students to be more aware – and appreciative – of our differences and similarities.

Below you’ll find 7 multicultural events and diversity holidays in April 2019. Some events might impact work schedules; others simply provide a great opportunity to celebrate specific diversity groups. For a complete list, see our interactive online diversity calendar.

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April, 2019 – Celebrate Diversity Month

Launched in 2004, Celebrate Diversity Month is featured each April to recognize and honor the nation’s diversity. Celebrate diversity – and boost awareness and inclusion – with our online diversity training!

The purpose is to help people from all walks of life gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of each other. From Allstate to TIAA, from the US Army to US Postal Service, Celebrate Diversity Month is widely recognized and celebrated by leading workplaces nationwide. This multicultural diversity event is not yet a federally-recognized theme month. 

 

April 1 – LGBTQ+ : Rachel Maddow

Diversity Events Calendar April

Rachel Anne Maddow (born April 1, 1973) is an American television host, liberal political commentator and author. Maddow became the first openly gay anchor to host a major prime-time news program in the United States.

 

April 4 – Black American : Maya Angelou (1928-2014)

Poet, writer, civil rights activist. Maya Angelou was a Renaissance woman whose versatility was reflected in the many roles she excelled in during her lifetime: poet, writer, journalist, actress, dancer, singer, educator, director, producer and civil rights activist. Maya Angelou received the country’s highest civilian honor when President Barack Obama named her a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2010.

 

April 8, 2019 – Buddhist : Buddha’s Birth

Siddhartha Gautama, who became known as Buddha or ‘enlightened one,’ was an Indian prince who left his family at the age of 29 to seek the truth of life. After years of wandering, meditation, and self-denial, he attained the enlightenment he sought at a place now called Buddha Gaya or Bodh Gaya. The religion he founded spread throughout central and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and Korea, and has also attracted followers in the West. Find out more about how religion impacts the workplace.

 

April 20, 2019 – Jewish : Passover (first day of 8-day observance)

April Diversity Calendar

Observed for eight days, this holiday celebrates the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt. The celebration of Passover, a spring festival commemorating freedom and new life, begins the previous evening with a Seder, a meal during which the story of Passover is read from the Haggadah. Jews observing the holiday abstain from eating any foods with leavening, such as bread, cake, and donuts. Before arranging any event involving food, check to see if invitees are following a special Passover diet.

 

April 21, 2019 – Christian : Easter

This religious holiday celebrates the resurrection of Jesus after he was crucified and died in Jerusalem. Jesus’ suffering and death on the cross, followed by his resurrection, is central to Christian faith. Easter is a joyous holiday, since it marks for Christians the fulfillment of the Biblical prophecy of the coming of the Messiah. In addition to its religious significance, Easter is also celebrated as a spring holiday with themes of rebirth, gathering with family and friends, and sharing special foods.

 

April 26, 2019 – Native American : Gathering of Nations Powwow

This three-day multicultural event, held annually at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, is the largest powwow in North America. More than 500 tribes from Canada and the United States participate in this annual celebration of American Indian culture. It features drum groups and ceremonial singing, chanting, dancing in traditional dress, and more. The Gathering of Nations organization seeks to promote the traditions and culture of the American Indian people in the most positive manner possible, and dispel stereotypes created about Native Americans.

Get a head start on next month, with our May 2020 Diversity Calendar. To discover more multicultural holidays and events, see our 2020 Diversity Calendar.

 

May 2018 Diversity Calendar

May 2018 offers a number of diversity events that require respectful scheduling, as well as multicultural holidays offering opportunities for awareness and inclusion. Here’s a selection from our online diversity calendar.

Jewish American Heritage Month

Jewish American Heritage Month

Leading our May multicultural calendar, Jewish American Heritage Month was established in 2006 by President George W. Bush, designating the month of May. “During Jewish American Heritage Month, we celebrate the rich history of the Jewish people in America and honor the great contributions they have made to our country,” Bush said. “As a nation of immigrants, the United States is better and stronger because Jewish people from all over the world have chosen to become American citizens.”

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

Launched in 1979 as Asian Heritage Week, it established by congressional proclamation. From then until 1993, the period for recognizing Asian/Pacific Americans was created by congressional proclamation each year. President George H. W. Bush, on October 23, 1992, signed legislation into law that made May of each year Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month.

 

Older Americans Month

Older Americans Month

Older Americans Month was established by presidential proclamation to honor the contributions of older Americans to society. The 2018 theme, Engage at Every Age, emphasizes that you are never too old (or young) to take part in activities that can enrich your physical, mental, and emotional well-being. It also celebrates the many ways in which older adults make a difference in our communities.

LGBT: Keith Harring – May 4

Keith Haring

Pop artist. Haring created a wide variety of public art, such as subway drawings of animals and human images and murals, including the first mural in a school yard on New York City’s Lower East Side and a mural on the Berlin Wall. In 1987, he used his art to support campaigns for AIDS awareness and created the Keith Haring Foundation to contribute to a wide variety of social concerns. This diversity event provides an excellent opportunity for LGBTQ+ inclusion.

Mexican American: Cinco de Mayo – May 5

Cinco de Mayo

The French attempted to occupy Mexico and make it part of its empire under Napoleon III, probably in an attempt to offset the growing power of the United States. On the morning of May 5, 1862, under General Ignacio Zaragoza, 5,000 ill-equipped Mestizo and Zapotec Indians defeated the French army in what came to be known as the Batalla de Puebla, which later was called Cinco de Mayo. The holiday tends to be celebrated more among Mexican-Americans, rather than in Mexico.

Islamic: Ramadan – floating holiday*

Ramadan 2018

*date varies annually: see our web-based Diversity Calendar for 2018 date

A key diversity holiday for May 2018, Ramadan begins the first day of the Islamic month of Ramadan, a month of fasting and the holiest month of the Muslim year. The fast of Ramadan is one of the Five Pillars of Islam, and mandatory for every Muslim who has reached puberty except those who are ill, pregnant, or on a journey. During this month, no water or food may be taken from sunrise to sunset.

Black: Malcolm X – May 19

Malcolm X

Civil rights leader. Malcolm Little adopted the name Malcolm X when he joined the Nation of Islam (Black Muslims), a religious movement advocating Black separatism. He became a leading spokesman for the Muslims. In 1964 he broke with the group, rejecting racial separatism and forming his own group, the Organization of Afro-American Unity. He continued to speak out until his assassination on February 21, 1965, urging blacks to take pride in their race and to take action to claim their civil and human rights.

Find out what you may have missed last month, in our Diversity Events Calendar for April 2018.

November 2017 Diversity Calendar

by Logan Arlen

The November 2017 diversity calendar features a wide array of diversity events that span from the triumphs of Black Americans to the struggles of the transgender community.  It’s also National Native American Heritage Month, giving people in the US the opportunity to discover more about these historic people. Learning about the culture and customs of others is essential to truly respecting them.

See what diversity dates you missed last month in our October 2017 Blog post. Check out the full November diversity calendar here

Barack Obama

Barack Obama

One of the most famous Black Americans in history and a symbol for our progress, Barack Obama is one of the most influential and respected men alive. November marks the day Obama was elected to become President of the United States, becoming the first Black American to ever be elected to the highest office. He is an iconic role model in the black community, and an inspiration for young men and women, proving that you can do anything no matter your skin color.

Transgender Day of Rememberance

Transgender Day of Remembrance

Each year since its creation in 1999, the Transgender Day of Remembrance memorializes those who have been slain due to their sexual orientation. TDoR seeks to bring attention to the ongoing violence towards the transgender community. It’s celebrated in more than 20 countries around the world, and helps to shed light on the plight of the transgendered people. It’s essential for awareness these issues of violence affect not only the transgender community, but the entire LGBTQ community.

National Native American Heritage Month

National Native American Heritage Month

Our Diversity Calendar for November 2017 features this monthly theme. Established by President George H. Bush in 1990, National American Indian Heritage Month gives a platform to indigenous Americans to share their traditions and cultures with the rest of the country. Another aim of this month is to extend opportunities for dialog between government and indigenous people,  address concerns and seeks solutions.

AllSaintsDay

All Saints Day

This observance celebrates all saints, both known and unknown. This holiday stems from the belief in a spiritual bond between the living on Earth and spirits in heaven. Catholics believe the day commemorates those who have attained the beatific vision in Heaven. The main element of the holiday revolves around “giving God solemn thanks for the lives and deaths of his saints,” and those who have personally led the faith in Jesus.

 

Veterans Day

Veterans Day/Armistice Day/ Remembrance Day

Veterans Day is an official US holiday to honor military veterans. Other countries celebrate Remembrance Day or Armistice Day as a mark of the anniversary of the end of World War 1. Veterans Day is different from Memorial Day in that it honors all Armed Forces veterans, while Memorial Day only honors those who died in service. Many business and government functions close during the holiday to show respect to the men and women who risk their lives to protect ours.

Mawlid

Mawlid

Otherwise known as Eid Milad Un Nabi, “Birth of the Prophet” is the observance of the Islamic prophet Muhammad’s Birthday. There are debates on the correct date of the holiday between Sunni Muslims and Shi’a Muslims. They believe the date is on the twelfth of Rabi’al-Awwal , or the seventeenth of Rabi’al-Awwal , respectively. Regardless of the actual date, this celebration is widely observed by Muslims. To learn more about Muslims and their beliefs, view cultural awareness and respect video.

Be sure to check out next month’s diversity calendar for a preview of November’s events. For a complete list of 2017 events, see our online diversity calendar.

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