May 2019 Diversity Calendar

May is a time of warmth, and thus a great time to have greater awareness – and appreciation – of diversity at home and worldwide.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events and diversity holidays in May 2019. Some – such as Ramadan – require respectful scheduling, while others are simply provide a great opportunity to celebrate specific diversity groups and say – we appreciate and include you!

 

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Mental Health Awareness Month

May 2019 Diversity Calendar

Our May 2019 diversity calendar features 4 month-long themes, including Mental Health Awareness Month. Also referred to as Mental Health Month, it’s been observed in May in the United States since 1949. The campaign reaches millions of people in the United States through the media, local events, and screenings. To promote mental health in your workplace, check out our workplace wellness videos.

 

Older Americans Month

Older Americans Month was established by presidential proclamation to honor the contributions of older Americans to society. For more information, visit the Older Americans Month website

 

Jewish American Heritage Month

Multicultural Events Calendar

May multicultural events include Jewish American Heritage Month. On April 20, 2006, President George W. Bush issued a presidential proclamation designating this annual theme. In his proclamation, the president said, ‘During Jewish American Heritage Month, we celebrate the rich history of the Jewish people in America and honor the great contributions they have made to our country. As a nation of immigrants, the United States is better and stronger because Jewish people from all over the world have chosen to become American citizens.”

 

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month began in 1979 as Asian Heritage Week, established by congressional proclamation. On October 23, 1992, President George H. W. Bush signed legislation into law that made May of each year Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month.

 

May 4 – LGBTQ+ : Keith Haring (1959-1990)

Diversity Holidays in May

Pop artist. Haring created a wide variety of public art, such as subway drawings of animals and human images and murals. His work ranged from the first mural in a school yard on New York City’s Lower East Side, to a mural on the Berlin Wall. Haring also created designs for performances and for Swatch watches. In 1987, he used his art to support campaigns for AIDS awareness and created the Keith Haring Foundation to contribute to a wide variety of social concerns. To boost LGBTQ+ inclusion in your workplace, check out the Anyone Can Be an Ally video.

 

May 6, 2019 – Islamic : Ramadan (5/6-6/4)

One of the key diversity holidays for May 2019. This begins the first day of the Islamic month of Ramadan, a month of fasting and the holiest month of the Muslim year. The fast of Ramadan is one of the Five Pillars of Islam, and mandatory for every Muslim who has reached puberty except those who are ill, pregnant, or on a journey. During this month, no water or food may be taken from sunrise to sunset. Before inviting someone to lunch or hosting a meal, check to see whether the invitee is observing the fast for this period. To see all upcoming religious holidays, see our online diversity calendar.

 

May 13 – Black American : Stevie Wonder

Stevland Hardaway Morris (born Stevland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950) is better known by his stage name, Stevie Wonder. One of the most critically and commercially successful musicians of the late 20th century, he’s been blind since shortly after birth. Wonder has sold more than 100 million records worldwide. He has recorded more than 30 U.S. top ten hits and received 25 Grammy Awards, one of the most-awarded male solo artists.

To see a list of key events for the entire year, see our 2019 diversity holidays calendar

December 2018 Diversity Calendar

According to a study by Harvard University, diversity training usually fails unless awareness and inclusion is a daily practice.

Our December 2018 Diversity Calendar features a diverse array of multicultural holidays calling for respectful scheduling, as well as opportunities for celebrating awareness and inclusion. Here you’ll find 7 key events in December: for a complete list, see our online diversity calendar.

International : World AIDS Day

Also known as United Nations World AIDS Day, this day has been declared by the World Health Organization as a time to increase education and awareness of AIDS.

Jewish : Hanukkah (12/2-12/10)

A key December diversity holiday is Hanukkah. Often misunderstood as the “Jewish Christmas” since it occurs in December, it commemorates the victory of the Jewish people over the Syrian Greeks in 165 B.C.E. This victory marked the end of a three-year period of religious persecution, restored Jewish independence, and ensured the survival of monotheism (belief in one God). Hanukkah is celebrated by lighting a candle on each of the eight days of celebration. This ceremony has given the holiday the additional name of “Festival of Lights.” Hanukkah is joyfully celebrated.

United Nations : International Day of Persons with Disabilities

One of the most important diversity events in December 2018. This international observance was established to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights, and well-being of persons with disabilities. It also seeks to foster awareness of the importance of integrating persons with disabilities into every aspect of life.

Buddhist : Bodhi Day (Buddha’s Enlightenment)

Among Mahãyãna Buddhists, this holiday celebrates Buddha’s attaining understanding of the truth of existence, freeing himself from all human suffering, and finding perfect happiness. The date is based on the Japanese Buddhist calendar.

Mexico : Las Posadas (12/16-12/24)

Las Posadas, celebrated from December 16 to December 24, commemorates Mary and Joseph’s effort to find an inn, and the events associated with the birth of Jesus. The holiday takes its name from the Spanish word posadas, meaning “a dwelling.” A candlelight procession represents the star in heaven that guided the three wise men on their way. After a religious ceremony on December 24, there is a traditional celebration centering on the piñata, a decorated clay container filled with toys and candy. When the piñata is broken, the children scramble for the candy.

Christian : Christmas

Most Christians observe Christmas to celebrate the birth of Jesus, and it is celebrated as a public holiday in many countries worldwide. Christmas is a family-oriented holiday with special foods, colorful decorations, and exchanging of gifts. Families often have their own traditions, especially concerning when gifts are exchanged and what foods are served. Jehovah’s Witnesses are among those who do not celebrate this holiday.

African American, African Heritage : Kwanzaa

Another essential multicultural holiday for December is Kwanzaa. First celebrated on December 26, 1966, the festival was created in the United States by scholar and cultural activist Dr. Maulana Karenga. Patterned after harvest festivals in Africa, Kwanzaa derives its name from the Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, meaning “first fruits.” Kwanzaa decorations traditionally use a color scheme of red, black, and green.  A Pan-African holiday, Kwanzaa is also celebrated in Africa, the Caribbean, South America, and in African communities in Europe.

These are just 7 highlights from our December 2018 diversity calendar. See our online diversity calendar, to find out key diversity events in the coming months, get inclusion tips, and more.

November 2018 Diversity Calendar

Our November 2018 Diversity Calendar features a diverse array of multicultural holidays calling for respectful scheduling, as well as opportunities for celebrating awareness and inclusion. Here you’ll find 7 key events in November: for a complete list, see our online diversity calendar.

According to a study by Harvard University, diversity training usually fails unless awareness and inclusion is a daily practice. So be sure to put these events on your work calendar.

 

Native American Heritage Month

Native Americans include hundreds of different tribes, speaking approximately 250 languages. President George H. W. Bush in August 1990 designated November as National American Indian Heritage Month. In his proclamation for 1996, President William J. Clinton noted, “Throughout our history, American Indian and Alaska Native peoples have been an integral part of the American character. Against all odds, America’s first peoples have endured, and they remain a vital cultural, political, social, and moral presence.”

National Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes Awareness Month

National Diabetes Month is observed every November so individuals, health care professionals, organizations, and communities across the country can bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. In the United States, some 29.1 million people – or 9.3% of the population – have diabetes, including 8.1 million people who are undiagnosed.

Movember

Movember is an annual event involving the growing of moustaches during the month of November. This is to raise awareness of men’s health issues, such as prostate cancer, testicular cancer and men’s suicide. Movember aims to increase early cancer detection, diagnosis and effective treatments, and ultimately reduce the number of preventable deaths. Besides annual check-ups, the Movember Foundation encourages men to be aware of family history of cancer and to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

November 1 Mexico : Day of the Dead

November multicultural holidays include this holiday, with roots in two traditions: the Christian observance of All Saints and All Souls Day, and two Aztec festivals honoring the souls of the dead. Flowers, foods, and favorite possessions celebrate the memory of deceased loved ones and to welcome their visiting souls. The holiday is celebrated with family and community gatherings, music, and feasting, and the festivity of its observance acknowledges death as an integral part of life.

November 1 LGBTQ+ : Tim Cook

Tim Cook

A key diversity event for November 2018 is the birthday of Timothy Donald Cook (November 1, 1960 – ), an American business executive, industrial engineer, and developer. In 2014, he became the first Chief Executive of a Fortune 500 company to publicly identify as gay. Cook is the Chief Executive Officer of Apple Inc., previously serving as the company’s Chief Operating Officer, under its founder Steve Jobs.

November 18 – Hispanic American : Roberto Goizueta

Roberto Goizueta

Roberto Críspulo Goizueta Cantera (November 18, 1931 – October 18, 1997) was a Cuban-American businessman, who was the first Hispanic CEO of a Fortune 500 company. Goizueta was Chairman, Director, and Chief Executive Officer of The Coca-Cola Company from August 1980 until his death in 1997. During his tenure, the Coca-Cola brand became the best-known trademark in the world.

November 30 Shirley Chisholm: Black American

Shirley Chisholm

Shirley Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to the U.S. Congress in 1968, where she served seven terms. While in Congress, Chisholm spoke out for civil rights, women’s rights, and the poor, and against the Vietnam War. In 1972 Chisholm became a Democratic candidate for President of the United States, the first major party Black American candidate for the U.S. presidency.

Find out about next month in our December 2018 diversity calendar. And see our online diversity calendar, to find out key diversity events in the coming months, get inclusion tips, and more.

February 2018 Diversity Calendar

Opportunities for Awareness and Inclusion, Respectful Scheduling

Our diversity calendar for February 2018 includes many events that require respectful scheduling. The month also offers a colorful array of opportunities to demonstrate awareness and practice inclusion.

Below are 7 key events for February, 2018. Please see our Online Diversity Calendar, to access all 100+ February events, moveable dates, and inclusion tips.

February Theme: Black History Month

Created in 1926, it was originally a week-long celebration of the contributions of African Americans to history. It was honored during the week of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday. In recent years, the observance expanded, and the entire month of February is celebrated as African American History Month. The theme is also known as Black History, Black Experience, and Afro-American History Month. Every year, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History sets a theme for the month.

 

Feb. 3- LGBT: Gertrude Stein

February 2018 LGBT Events

A ground-breaking American writer, Stein was the most celebrated lesbian author of the early 20th century. Her Paris home became a salon for the leading artists and writers of the period between World Wars I and II. She lived with her lifelong companion, Alice B. Toklas. Stein named her most famous work, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, after her partner.

 

Date Varies* – Christian: Ash Wednesday

Christian Events Feb 2018

This marks the beginning of Lent, a 40-day period of prayer and fasting preceding Easter Sunday. It’s observed in memory of Jesus’ 40 days of fasting in the desert. Many Roman Catholics and Protestants choose to give up a favorite food or activity during Lent. The placing of ashes on the forehead, in the shape of a cross, is part of the preparation for fasting and resistance to temptation.

*for the 2018 date of this and other moveable holidays, see our Online Diversity Calendar

Date Varies – Hindu: Parinirvana or Nirvana Day

Hindu Events Feb 2018

In the Mahãyãna Buddhist tradition, this day marks the death of Buddha in 483 B.C.E. and commemorates his attainment of final Nirvana. The date is based on the Japanese Buddhist calendar.

 

Feb. 15 – Women: Susan B Anthony

Women's Diversity Events FebruaryA leading women’s rights activist, Anthony was a leader of the movement to gain women the right to vote. As co- leader of the Women’s Temperance Movement, she secured the first laws in New York State giving women control over their children, property, and wages.

 

Date Varies – Chinese New Year

Feb 2018 Intercultural CalendarAlso called Spring Festival, this is the beginning of a three-day celebration of the Chinese New Year. The festivities mark the beginning of year 4716 (The Year of the Dog) since the mythical founding of the Chinese people. Celebrations include fireworks, a dragon dance and the beating of drums and cymbals, visits to temples, and prayers for blessings in the new year.

 

Feb. 21 – Black: Barbara Jordan

Feb 2018 Black Diversity EventsIn 1966, Jordan was the first Black woman elected to the Texas State Senate. She later became the first woman and first African American elected to Congress from Texas. Jordan graduated magna cum laude from Texas Southern University and Boston University Law School.

Those are 7 events from our February 2018 Diversity Calendar. To view all 100+ events, moveable dates, and inclusion tips, please see our Online Diversity Calendar.

October 2017 Diversity Calendar

by Logan Arlen

The month of October is widely known for the peak of autumn and Halloween. But our October 2017 Diversity Calendar features celebration of inclusion events, including National Disability Employment Awareness Month, Global Diversity Awareness Month, LGBT History Month, and more.

While these are three major diversity events that span the entire month, there are many more important dates in October. To see what diversity events you missed last month look at the September’s 2017 blog post

Check out the full diversity calendar

National Disability Employment Awareness

National Disability Employment Awareness

Declared by Congress in 1988 in order to raise awareness of the contributions and needs of people with disabilities.  “Smart employers know that including different perspectives in problem-solving situations leads to better solutions,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta when NDEA was established. “Hiring employees with diverse abilities strengthens their business, increases competition and drives innovation.” This sentiment is still true today, now more than ever.

LGBT History Month

LGBT History Month

Another October 2017 diversity month theme is LGBT History Month. A Missouri high-school teacher, Rodney Wilson, first proposed the idea in 1994. Wilson chose October because it’s the anniversary of first and second March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, as well as the month in which National Coming Out Day is honored. LGBT History Month is celebrated in the United States and many countries around the world, but not all of them are in October. View our LGBT training video Anyone Can Be an Ally.

Sukkot

Jewish: Sukkot

Sukkot, or the Feast of Tabernacles, is named after the Sukkah erected and adorned with fruits and vegetables. These symbolize the temporary dwellings farmers lived in during harvest, and the dwellings Israelites lived in during their 40-year journey through the desert. Sukkot is one of the three ‘pilgrimage festivals’ during which Jews must perform a pilgrimage to the holy temple. Each day of the holiday it is required to perform a ceremony in which the Four Species are waved.

Imam W.D. Mohammed

African American/Islam: Imam W.D. Mohammed (born Wallace Dean Muhammad)

Son of the leader of the Nation of Islam, Elijah Muhammad, W.D. succeeded his father and transformed the Nation of Islam to a mainstream Islamic group from a small black separatist organization. W.D. emphasized religious and racial tolerance to his followers and opened his new group to Muslims of all races.

He also disbanded the Nation of Islam’s paramilitary force, renamed temples to “mosques” ministers to “imams”, and abolished the dress code. After several other name changes, Imam settled on the “Muslim American Community” in the 1990s.

United Nations Day

Global Event: United Nations Day

October 24th commemorates the formation of the United Nations in 1945. After the conclusion of World War II, the world banded together to create a council of nations to better the world. Franklin D. Roosevelt coined the term United Nations during WWII to describe the Allied countries at war with the Axis countries. Five of these Allied countries – The United States, United Kingdom, Soviet Union, the Republic of China, and France – became permanent members of the UN’s Security Council, who ratified the charter creating the UN.

Global Diversity Awareness Month

Global Diversity Awareness Month

Our diversity calendar for October 2017 also includes Global Diversity Awareness Month, which promotes open mindedness and celebration of differences. Building an inclusive workplace is key to increasing employee morale and productivity. Inclusion is based on ensuring everyone receives equal treatment, and understanding different cultural perspectives and values. View our global diversity training video Building the Multicultural team.

Be sure to check out next month’s diversity calendar for a preview of November’s events. For a complete list of 2017 events, see our online diversity calendar.

September 2017 Diversity Calendar

by Logan Arlen

Our September 2017 diversity calendar features a colorful array of must-know diversity events, starting with Hispanic Heritage Month. The month also features two of the most important dates on the Jewish calendar, and key celebrations in Eastern Asian religions. Finally, we celebrate the birthdays of multicultural notables – such as Jesse Owens – who overcame the odds to inspire change.

Check out the full September diversity calendar here


September African American Black History Events

Black American: Jesse Owens, Sept. 12
In a time when the world needed a symbol of hope to combat Hitler’s aryan supremacy ideology, Owens answered the call. A year before the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Owens achieved a feat that has been called “the greatest 45 minutes ever in sports.” He set three world records and tied another at the 1935 Big Ten track meet.

During the Berlin Olympics, Owens won global admiration with four gold medals: 100 meters, 200 meters, long jump, and 4 x 10 meter relay. His triumph as a black man and the most-decorated athlete at the games was seen as “single-handedly crushing Hitler’s myth of Aryan supremacy”.

Women/LGBT: Jane Addams, Sept. 6
Addam’s profound impact and creation of the social worker occupation led to her being the first woman awarded a Nobel Peace Prize, and first lesbian. Known as the “Mother of Social Work,” Addams was one of the most prominent reformist of the Progressive Era, a period of widespread social activism and political reform across the US. Addams’ publicized and focused on issues such as public health and the needs of children, issues that were mainly of mothers’ concern.

In her famed essay “Utilization of Women in City Government,” Addams noted connections between the household and government workings. She believed that many departments of government can be traced to traditional women’s roles, thus women would be more knowledgeable on the topic.

Hispanic Heritage Month
From Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, the United States celebrates the heritage and culture of Hispanic and Latino Americans. Originally established by President Lyndon Johnson in 1968, and only week long it was changed by Ronald Reagan in 1988.

Latino and Hispanic are broad terms that can refer to Central or South American, Puerto Rican, or other Spanish cultures and origins. About 17% of the United States is Hispanic, so it bodes well to celebrate this multicultural group, especially as its size and influence grows


Continue to part 2 to find out what the major religious and the diversity events this month you could be missing out on.

June 2017 Diversity Calendar

June 2017 Diversity Calendar

June is perhaps best known as the advent of summer. But our June 2017 diversity calendar also provides many opportunities to celebrate a colorful rainbow of diversity in your workplace.

Below is a partial list of June 2017 diversity events. For a complete list, please see our interactive online calendar.

LGBT

June is LGBT pride month nationwide, as proclaimed by President Bill Clinton in June, 2000.

Another key LGBT event is:

June 28 – the anniversary of Stonewall Rebellion. On this day in 1969, the LGBT community fought back against police harassment. It’s seen as the first organized LGBT effort in the United States to openly gain equality under the law.

June is an ideal time for LGBT sensitivity training, such as our most popular LGBT video, Anyone Can Be an Ally.

Religion

June 2017 features a number of religious holidays.

Christianity
June 4 – Pentecost – Also known as Whit Sunday, the Pentecost commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the apostles, and thus the birth of the Christian Church.

Other holidays include Trinity All Saints Day, the Feast of Corpus Christy, and the Feast of Sacred Heart. Please check our online diversity calendar for 2017 dates.

Islam
24 – Eid al-Fitr . Beginning at sighting of crescent moon, Eid al Fitr signals the end of Ramadan, a month of fasting and other observances.

Mormon
June 1 – birthday of Brigham Young, founder of the Church of Later Day Saints

Pagan and Wiccan
June 26 – Litha begins at sundown

Black Americans

June 19- Juneteenth commemorates the emancipation of all slaves in Texas. It’s a time for celebrations in Black American communities, including rallies, speeches, art and music, and more.

June also features the birthdays of numerous Black American diversity leaders, please see our online diversity calendar.

Jews

Judaism is the #2 most-practiced religion in the United States, so every month it’s essential to recognize your Jewish employees, customers and more. A great way to celebrate is with the birthdays of notable jews. One such date is:

June 12 – Anne Frank birthday – Born in Germany, Frank is because one of the best-known Jewish victims of the Holocaust. She gained fame after death, with the publication of The Diary of a Young Girl, in which she journals about her life in hiding during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II.

Disabled 

Nearly 1 in 5 Americans – or 19%  – has a disability, whether physical, mental or other. Create greater inclusion by celebrating the accomplishments of the disabled, such as:

June 27 – Helen Keller, birthday – Keller was an American author, lecturer, and political activist. As the first deaf and blind person to earn a college degree, Keller is widely inspiring to the disabled community.

July is just around the corner. Discover 7 key events for next month with our July 2017 Diversity Calendar.

 

May 2017 Diversity Calendar

May 2017 Diversity Calendar

The month of May brings more than just flowers. It also offers a unique opportunity to increase awareness and celebrate a colorful bouquet of diversity events. Below is a partial list of events from our May 2017 Diversity Calendar.

For a complete list of upcoming diversity events, please see our online diversity calendar.

Older, Jewish and Asian Americans

The month of May has an abundance of monthly diversity themes. These include:
Older Americans Month
Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month
Jewish American Heritage Month

Another area that’s increasingly receiving recognition as a facet of diversity is mental illness and learning disabilities. With that in mind, May is also Mental Health Awareness Month.

Black Americans

May provides a number of multicultural opportunities to celebrate the accomplishments of Black Americans. Some notable birthdays include:

Malcolm X
Malcolm X

May 19 – Malcolm X – civil rights leader and activist

May 3 – James Brown – the Godfather of Soul, one of the greatest black musicians of all time

Further, May 17 marks the anniversary of the watershed in desegregation, with the landmark court decision Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka (1954).

 

Hispanics Americans

May 5 – Cinco de Mayo – marking the defeat of French invaders by Mexico, this multicultural holidays is celebrated widely by Americans and the Mexican-American community. It’s important to note it’s not a major holiday its country of origin, Mexico.

 

Religious Observances

May 25 – Ascension Day, Christianity: marks the anniversary of the day Christians believe that Jesus rose to heaven.  Christianity is the world’s most-practiced religion.

Ramadan
Ramadan

May 26 (sundown) – Ramadan begins, Islam – this month-long observance includes fasting from sunrise to sunset. It’s one of the most important events in Islam, the world’s second largest religion.

May 30 (sundown) – Shavout, Judaism – also known as the Festival of Weeks, it celebrates the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai.  Judaism is the second largest religion in the United States.

 

LBGT

Finally, the month of May includes a number of important events in the LGBT community. These include these notable birthdays:

Keith Haring
Keith Haring

May 4 – Keith Harring – one of the most famous and iconic gay artists of the 20th century
May 22 – Harvey Milk – murdered politician, and considered a martyr and icon for the gay rights movement

Our May 2017 Diversity Calendar includes more than 150 diversity events. For great diversity awareness, please see our online diversity calendar for a complete list of upcoming diversity events.

 

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