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October 2019 Diversity Calendar

October heralds the wonderful colors of autumn. That makes October an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our colorful differences and similarities. Indeed, there are three major October diversity month themes below.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events in October 2019. These diversity holidays might respectful scheduling – such as Yom Kippur. Others offer an opportunity to give a shout out to diverse groups, ranging from LGBTQ+ to people with disabilities. Check out our Online Diversity Calendar™ to see all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get inclusion tips for your employees.

October 2019: Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast Cancer Awareness Month, also called National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the USA, is an annual international health campaign. It’s promoted by major breast cancer charities every October, to increase awareness of the disease, and to raise funds for research into its cause, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure. The campaign also offers information and support to those affected by breast cancer.

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Global Diversity Awareness Month

October 2019 Diversity Calendar

Another October diversity event in 2019 is Global Diversity Awareness Month. Global diversity awareness focuses on understanding differing cultural perspectives, and valuing the diverse perspectives of all people from all places. Fueled by the belief that workforce diversity is a major business advantage, global diversity awareness promotes cultural diversity training and an inclusive global environment.

 

National Disability Employment Awareness Month

Designate by President Reagan in 1988, this October diversity month seeks to enhance public awareness of those with disabilities, and encourage their full integration into the workforce. For more information, visit the U.S. Department of Labor National Disability Employment Awareness Month webpage.

 

October 9, 2019 – Jewish : Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement)

October Multicultural Events

A key October multicultural holiday is Yom Kippur. The ten days from Rosh Hashanah to Yom Kippur are known as the Days of Awe or the Days of Repentance. During this time Jews are to remind themselves of their sins, and seek forgiveness for their wrongdoings. Many Jews observe Yom Kippur, the holiest Jewish holiday, by taking no food or water from sundown the day before through sundown the following day. It is also common for Jews not to work the night before or day of Yom Kippur. For more religious holidays, see our 2020 Interfaith Calendar

 

October 10 – People with Disabilities : World Mental Health Day

World Mental Health Day is a day for global mental health education, awareness and advocacy against social stigma. It was first celebrated in 1992 at the initiative of the World Federation for Mental Health. The federation is a global mental health organization with members and contacts in more than 150 countries. Every October 10, advocates promote this annual awareness program to bring attention to mental illness, as well as promote workplace wellness training .

 

October 11 – LGBTQ+ : National Coming Out Day/March on Washington 

The key LGBTQ+ diversity event in October. On this day in 1987, saw the largest gay and lesbian gathering in history, with estimates ranging from 200,000 to 600,000 protestors. The crowd protested anti-gay discrimination, and demanded a stronger government response to the AIDS crisis.

 

October 27, 2019 – Hindu : Diwali

Diversity Holidays October 2019A major October diversity holiday, Diwali is one of the most important annual festivals in the Hindu religion. Lasting five days, Diwali encompasses a variety of festivals, celebrating various gods and goddesses, and events in their lives. Since Diwali is a ‘festival of lights,’ candles are an appropriate gift.

Get a head start, and check out our November 2019 diversity calendar. Or better yet, discover our Online Diversity Calendar™ to see all upcoming 2019/2020 diversity holidays and get inclusion tips for your employees.

September 2019 Diversity Calendar

September bring autumn, and the leaves of change. So it’s a great time to inspire your people to be more aware and respectful of our differences – and similarities.

Here you’ll find our diversity calendar for September 2019, featuring 7 events and multicultural holidays. Some might impact the workplace, while others are a time to celebrate diverse groups. See our Online Diversity Calendar™ to see all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get helpful inclusion tips for your employees.

National Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15-October 15

Leading our September multicultural calendar is National Hispanic Heritage Month. Launched in 1968 as National Hispanic Heritage Week, the celebration includes September 15 and 16, the independence days for Central American nations and Mexico, respectively. In 1988, the period was expanded to National Hispanic Heritage Month.

Each year the National Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers and the Hispanic Foundation select a theme for the month, and commission a poster to reflect that theme. An important part of respecting Hispanics is being aware of communication differences, as explored in this training video on cross cultural communication.

Online Diversity Calendar™
Easy Awareness & Inclusion: 365

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  • Web-Based + Outlook/Google Calendar
  • Enjoy Real-Time Inclusion Tips™
  • Always Schedule Respectfully
  • Get Diversity Celebration Themes

 

September 2, 2019 – Hindu : Ganesh Chaturthi

September multicultural diversity
This Hindu festival is a key diversity holiday in Sept. 2019. It’s celebrated in honour of the elephant-headed god, Ganesha, usually in August or September. The festival generally lasts ten days, and is also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi or Vinayaka Chavithi. For more religious holidays, see our 2020 Interfaith Calendar

 

September 16 – Mexico : Independence Day (El Día de Independencia)

On September 16, 1810, in the town of Dolores in the province of Guanajuato, a handful of people were summoned by a parish priest to take up arms against the Spanish colonial government. This began the fight for independence that ended 350 years of Spanish rule. Celebrated by people of Mexican origin throughout the world, this is a day when Mexican Americans often hang Mexican flags at their homes.

 

September 20 – Black American : Ursula Burns

Multicultural Events Sept 2019
‘I’m a black lady from the Lower East Side of New York. Not a lot intimidates me. Believe that there are no limitations, no barriers to your success — you will be empowered and you will achieve.’

-Ursula Burns

Diversity events include the birthdays of diversity leaders, such as Ursula M. Burns (September 20, 1958 – ). Burns is an American business executive, and the first black woman CEO to head a Fortune 500 company. In 2014, Forbes rated her the 22nd most powerful woman in the world.

 

September 20 – Women : HeForShe

HeForShe is a solidarity campaign for the advancement of gender equality, initiated by the United Nations. Founded on September 20th, 2014, it’s backed by a number of celebrities, notably actress Emma Watson.

Its goal is to achieve equality by encouraging all genders as agents of change and take action against negative stereotypes and behaviors, faced by people with feminine personalities/genders. Sexual harassment prevention training is key to gender equality.

 

September 25 – People with Disabilities : Christopher Reeve (1952-2004)

Christopher Reeve was an actor, including starring in the hist Superman, as well as acting in 17 feature films, a dozen TV movies, and more than 150 plays. His career was cut short after an equestrian accident. Reeve landed head first, fracturing the uppermost vertebrae in his spine, instantly paralyzing him from the neck down. After a grueling effort to regain his ability to breathe and speak, Reeve became an advocate for research on healing spinal cord injuries. He became Chairman of the American Paralysis Association and Vice Chairman of the National Organization on Disability. He also became a national spokesperson for and raised funds in support of stem cell research.

 

September 30, 2019 – Jewish : Rosh Hashanah (New Year) (9/30-10/1)

September multicultural holidays

Rounding out our September 2019 diversity calendar is Rosh Hashanah. Like most Jewish holidays, it begins at sundown the evening before the first (full) day of the holiday. Rosh Hashanah signifies the beginning of the Days of Awe, a period of serious reflection about the past year and the year to come. This period, which continues until Yom Kippur, is a time for asking forgiveness from both God and other people, and committing oneself to live a better life in the year to come.

To find out more multicultural holidays and events, see our Online Diversity Calendar™ to enjoy all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get helpful inclusion tips for your employees.

April 2019 Diversity Calendar

For the most current events, see our April 2020 Diversity Calendar

April is a time when many traditions celebrate spring, and also features Celebrate Diversity Month. So April is a great time to inspire your employees and students to be more aware – and appreciative – of our differences and similarities.

Below you’ll find 7 multicultural events and diversity holidays in April 2019. Some events might impact work schedules; others simply provide a great opportunity to celebrate specific diversity groups. For a complete list, see our interactive online diversity calendar.

Online Diversity Calendar™
Easy Awareness & Inclusion: 365

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April, 2019 – Celebrate Diversity Month

Launched in 2004, Celebrate Diversity Month is featured each April to recognize and honor the nation’s diversity. Celebrate diversity – and boost awareness and inclusion – with our online diversity training!

The purpose is to help people from all walks of life gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of each other. From Allstate to TIAA, from the US Army to US Postal Service, Celebrate Diversity Month is widely recognized and celebrated by leading workplaces nationwide. This multicultural diversity event is not yet a federally-recognized theme month. 

 

April 1 – LGBTQ+ : Rachel Maddow

Diversity Events Calendar April

Rachel Anne Maddow (born April 1, 1973) is an American television host, liberal political commentator and author. Maddow became the first openly gay anchor to host a major prime-time news program in the United States.

 

April 4 – Black American : Maya Angelou (1928-2014)

Poet, writer, civil rights activist. Maya Angelou was a Renaissance woman whose versatility was reflected in the many roles she excelled in during her lifetime: poet, writer, journalist, actress, dancer, singer, educator, director, producer and civil rights activist. Maya Angelou received the country’s highest civilian honor when President Barack Obama named her a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2010.

 

April 8, 2019 – Buddhist : Buddha’s Birth

Siddhartha Gautama, who became known as Buddha or ‘enlightened one,’ was an Indian prince who left his family at the age of 29 to seek the truth of life. After years of wandering, meditation, and self-denial, he attained the enlightenment he sought at a place now called Buddha Gaya or Bodh Gaya. The religion he founded spread throughout central and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and Korea, and has also attracted followers in the West. Find out more about how religion impacts the workplace.

 

April 20, 2019 – Jewish : Passover (first day of 8-day observance)

April Diversity Calendar

Observed for eight days, this holiday celebrates the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt. The celebration of Passover, a spring festival commemorating freedom and new life, begins the previous evening with a Seder, a meal during which the story of Passover is read from the Haggadah. Jews observing the holiday abstain from eating any foods with leavening, such as bread, cake, and donuts. Before arranging any event involving food, check to see if invitees are following a special Passover diet.

 

April 21, 2019 – Christian : Easter

This religious holiday celebrates the resurrection of Jesus after he was crucified and died in Jerusalem. Jesus’ suffering and death on the cross, followed by his resurrection, is central to Christian faith. Easter is a joyous holiday, since it marks for Christians the fulfillment of the Biblical prophecy of the coming of the Messiah. In addition to its religious significance, Easter is also celebrated as a spring holiday with themes of rebirth, gathering with family and friends, and sharing special foods.

 

April 26, 2019 – Native American : Gathering of Nations Powwow

This three-day multicultural event, held annually at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, is the largest powwow in North America. More than 500 tribes from Canada and the United States participate in this annual celebration of American Indian culture. It features drum groups and ceremonial singing, chanting, dancing in traditional dress, and more. The Gathering of Nations organization seeks to promote the traditions and culture of the American Indian people in the most positive manner possible, and dispel stereotypes created about Native Americans.

Get a head start on next month, with our May 2020 Diversity Calendar. To discover more multicultural holidays and events, see our 2020 Diversity Calendar.

 

March 2019 Diversity Calendar

March is the advent of spring, and the hope of colorful flowers under a rainbow of diversity. That makes March an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our wonderful differences and similarities.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events and holidays in March 2019 that require respectful scheduling – or just provide an opportunity to shout out and say “we’re different and – together – we are awesome.”

 

March 2019 – Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month is an annual observance of the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. It is celebrated during March in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia, corresponding with International Women’s Day on March 8. The theme for 2019 is “Visionary Women: Champions of Peace & Nonviolence.” This makes March an ideal time to support the #metoo movement and promoting training for sexual harassment prevention.

 

March 1 – Hispanic American/Women: Geisha Williams

Geisha J. Williams (born 1961 or 1962) is an American businesswoman. She became the first female Hispanic CEO of a Fortune 500 company on March 1, 2017, when she became president and CEO of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). Williams was born in Cuba, and emigrated to the U.S. with her family. She joined PG&E in 2007.

 

March 6 – Black American/Muslim : Shaquille O’Neal

March 2019 Diversity Calendar

Shaquille O’Neal Shaquille Rashaun O’Neal (born March 6, 1972), nicknamed ‘Shaq’, is an American retired professional basketball. Widely considered one of the greatest players in NBA history, he is a practicing Muslim. O’Neal was raised by a Baptist mother and a Muslim stepfather. In a 2010 interview he confirmed his plans to undertake the Muslim pilgrimage, called Hajj. Discover more about how religion impacts the workplace.

 

March 6, 2019 – Christian : Ash Wednesday

This marks the beginning of Lent, a 40-day period of prayer and fasting preceding Easter Sunday. It is observed in memory of Jesus’ 40 days of fasting in the desert. In the early centuries of Christianity, there were strict requirements for fasting during the period of preparation for Easter. Although these rules have been relaxed in the Western church, many Roman Catholics and Protestants choose to give up a favorite food or activity during Lent.

 

March 21, 2019 – Hindu : Holi

Multicultural Calendar March 2019

Holi, the festival of colors, celebrates the coming of spring throughout India and the new harvest of the winter crop. It is celebrated over two days. Newly harvested grains, coconuts, and sweets are thrown into the fire as offerings, followed by singing and dancing around the bonfire.

 

March 25 – United Nations : International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

This is a day to honor and remember the more than 15 million men, women and children who were victims of the 400-year transatlantic slave trade, one of the darkest and most tragic chapters in human history. It is also a time to raise awareness about the dangers of racism and prejudice in today’s world.

 

March 26 – Italian American : Nancy Pelosi

Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is an American politician. She was the first woman to become Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, attaining the highest rank of any female politician in U.S. history. She served as the 52nd House Speaker from 2007 to 2011, the only woman to do so. As Speaker, she became the first woman and the first Italian-American to lead a major party in Congress.

To discover more multicultural holidays and events, see our April diversity calendar or our diversity holiday calendar for 2019

July 2018 Diversity Calendar

Our July 2018 Diversity Calendar highlights a number of events that call for respectful scheduling, as well as multicultural holidays presenting opportunities for awareness and inclusion. Here you’ll find 7 key events in July: for a complete list, see our online diversity calendar.

Black: Thurgood Marshall – July 2

Thurgood Marshall

Civil rights leader and Supreme Court justice. As head of the legal services division of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People from 1938 to 1962, Thurgood Marshall led the legal effort to advance the civil rights of all Americans, particularly those belonging to minority groups. His most famous victory was the 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka ending racial segregation in public schools. He continued to work for civil rights and equal opportunity as a judge most notably as the first Black American associate justice of the Supreme Court.

Tibetan: 14th Dalai Lama – July 6

Dalai LamaThe

14th Dalai Lama, born 6 July 1935, is the current Dalai Lama. Dalai Lamas are important monks of the Gelug school, the newest school of Tibetan Buddhism. During the 1959 Tibetan uprising, the Dalai Lama fled to India, where he currently lives as a refugee. The 14th Dalai Lama received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. He has traveled the world and has spoken about the welfare of Tibetans, environment, economics, women’s rights, non-violence, interfaith dialogue, physics, astronomy, Buddhism and science, cognitive neuroscience, reproductive health, and sexuality, along with various Mahayana and Vajrayana topics.

Mexican: Frida Kahlo – July 6

Frida KahloPainter. Born in Coyoacán on the outskirts of Mexico City three years before the beginning of the Mexican Revolution, Frida Kahlo was one of the most individualistic painters of the first half of the twentieth century. Known for her distinctive self-portraits filled with rich colors and symbolic imagery, Kahlo expressed in form and color on canvas her innermost feelings and states of mind. One of her self-portraits, The Frame, was purchased by the Louvre—the museum’s first purchase of a work by a twentieth-century Mexican artist.

France: Bastille Day – July 14

Bastille Day

This celebrates the fall of the Bastille prison, marking the beginning of the French Revolution in 1789 and the eventual end of monarchial rule and the creation of a French Republic.

South African: Nelson Mandela – July 18

Nelson Mandela

Anti-apartheid activist, lawyer, politician, humanitarian, and first Black president of South Africa. (See Nelson Mandela, Nelson Mandela International Day, and Reconciliation Day.)

Disabled: Americans with Disabilities Act  – July 26

Americans with Disabilities

Signed into law on this date, this milestone of U.S. civil rights legislation protects people with disabilities from discrimination in the areas of employment, transportation, and public accommodation. The law requires a wide range of public and private establishments to make new and renovated facilities accessible to people with disabilities and to make “readily achievable” changes to existing facilities in order to increase accessibility.

Jewish: Milton Friedman July 31

Milton Friedman

Economist. Awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1976, Milton Friedman was one of the most influential economists of the twentieth century, making major contributions to the fields of macroeconomics, microeconomics, economic history, and statistics. Friedman served on President Reagan’s Economic Policy Advisory Board and in 1988 was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

These are only 7 diversity events for July 2018. For a complete list, plus tips for inclusion, see our web-based diversity calendar.

April 2018 Diversity Calendar

Here are 7 highlights from our April 2018 Diversity Calendar; for a complete list of 2018 diversity events, plus dozens of inclusion tips, see our interactive Online Calendar.

Christian: Easter – date varies

April 2018 Diversity Event: Easter

Easter is one of the most important holiday days in the world’s largest religion. It celebrates the resurrection of Jesus, after he was crucified and died in Jerusalem. Easter is a joyous holiday, marking for Christians the fulfillment of the Biblical prophecy of the coming of the Messiah. In addition to its religious significance, Easter is celebrated as a spring holiday with themes of rebirth, gathering with family and friends, and sharing special foods.

Black: Maya Angelou – April 4

April Multicultural Events: Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou was a Renaissance woman. Her versatility was reflected in the many roles she excelled in: poet, writer, journalist, actress, dancer, singer, educator, director, producer, and civil rights activist. She is perhaps best known for her poetry and autobiographies, including “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.” In 2010, Angelou received the country’s highest civilian honor when President Barack Obama named her a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Scottish American: Tartan Day – April 6

Diversity Calendar Scottish American Tartan Day

Our April 2018 multicultural calendar includes Tartan Day, established by an act of Congress in 1998 to recognize the role Scottish Americans played in the founding of the nation. It also acknowledges the many contributions that have been made by people of Scottish ancestry, including Alexander Hamilton, Andrew Carnegie, Woodrow Wilson and more.

Jewish: Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust – date varies

Jewish Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust April 2018

This eight-day-long observance runs from the Sunday on or before through the Sunday after Yom Hashoah, the Jewish observance of Holocaust Memorial Day. It’s a time of civic commemorations to remember the Holocaust victims, and educational programs to teach the lessons of the Holocaust. The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., sets a theme for each year’s programs.

Buddhist: Buddha’s Birth – April 8

April Religious Observances Buddha's Birth

This is key diversity holiday in April 2018. Siddhartha Gautama, who became known as Buddha or “enlightened one,” was an Indian prince who left his family at the age of 29 to seek the truth of life. After years of wandering, meditation, and self-denial, he attained the enlightenment. The religion he founded spread throughout central and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and Korea, and has also attracted followers in the West.

French: David Servan-Schreiber – April 21

David Servan-Schreiber

A psychiatrist and neuroscientist, Servan-Schreiber was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor at the age of 31. He created his own treatment program of integrative approaches to lifestyle and health, keeping the cancer in check for 15 years. His books include Healing Without Freud or Prozac: Natural Approaches to Curing Stress, Anxiety and Depression (2003) and Anticancer: A New Way of Life (2007), a revolutionary approach to the understanding and treatment of cancer.

Native American: Gathering of Nations – date varies

Native American: Gathering of NationsThis three-day event, held annually at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, is the largest powwow in North America. More than 500 tribes from Canada and the United States come every year to participate in this celebration of American Indian culture. The Gathering of Nations organization seeks to dispel stereotypes, and promote the traditions and culture of the American Indian people in a positive manner.

Find out what you missed last month, in our March 2018 diversity calendar. Or get a preview of next month with our Multicultural Events Calendar for May 2018.

March 2018 Diversity Calendar

 

March National Women’s History Month

The highlight of the March 2018 Diversity Calendar is Women’s History Month. This annual theme month honors the accomplishment of women in history and contemporary society. It’s celebrated in March in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia, along with International Women’s Day on March 8. In the United States, women’s history week started in 1980, followed by Women’s History Month in 1987.
 

Hindu: Holi – date varies*

*for the 2018 date of this and other moveable holidays, see our Online Diversity Calendar

Holi Hindu Festival 2018

One of the most colorful diversity events, Holi celebrates the coming of spring throughout India and the new harvest of the winter crop. It is celebrated over two days, with newly harvested grains, coconuts, and sweets are thrown into the fire as offerings. The following day is the festival of colors, a riotous and exuberant celebration of throwing colored powder, as well as dancing, singing, feasting, and more.
 

Black: Harriet Tubman – March 10Harriet Tubman birthday

Our March 2018 multicultural calendar also features Harriet Tubman. A leading abolitionist, Tubman was known as the conductor on the Underground Railroad, a secret system for helping slaves escape to freedom in the North. An escaped slave, she earned the nickname “Moses” for her heroic work in leading more than 400 slaves to freedom. She died on this date.
 

Jewish German American: Albert Einstein – March 14
Albert Einstein birthday

The leading theoretical physicist of the twentieth century, Einstein received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1921. When the Nazi government confiscated his property and deprived him of German citizenship in 1933, Einstein immigrated to the United States, where he became a naturalized citizen and took a post at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.
 

Irish: St Patrick’s Day – date varies* St Patrick's Day 2018

St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated by people of Irish descent all over the world as an expression of pride in their heritage. Ireland’s patron saint, the anniversary of his death is celebrated in Ireland as a national holiday. Green, the color of the day, signifies undying gratitude to the memory of St. Patrick, who brought Christianity to Ireland. The shamrock is worn to commemorate its use by the saint as a symbol of the Trinity.
 

Jewish: Passover begins – date varies* Passover 2018

One of the key diversity holidays is Passover. Observed for eight days, it marks the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt. Moses confronted the Pharaoh in the name of God, demanding freedom for his people. The celebration of Passover, a spring festival commemorating freedom and new life, begins the previous evening with a Seder, a meal during which the story of Passover is read from the Haggadah.
 

Mexican American: Cesar Chavez – March 31
Cesar Chavez birthday

A labor leader and activist, Chavez was a migrant farm worker who became a nationally respected voice for social justice. He spent his life combating the poverty and discrimination suffered by Mexicans and Mexican Americans, particularly agricultural laborers. In 1962, he began organizing farm workers in a strike against California grape growers for better wages and more humane working conditions.

For a complete list of more than 100 diversity events + inclusion tips, see our online diversity calendar.

February 2018 Diversity Calendar

Opportunities for Awareness and Inclusion, Respectful Scheduling

Our diversity calendar for February 2018 includes many events that require respectful scheduling. The month also offers a colorful array of opportunities to demonstrate awareness and practice inclusion.

Below are 7 key events for February, 2018. Please see our Online Diversity Calendar, to access all 100+ February events, moveable dates, and inclusion tips.

February Theme: Black History Month

Created in 1926, it was originally a week-long celebration of the contributions of African Americans to history. It was honored during the week of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday. In recent years, the observance expanded, and the entire month of February is celebrated as African American History Month. The theme is also known as Black History, Black Experience, and Afro-American History Month. Every year, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History sets a theme for the month.

 

Feb. 3- LGBT: Gertrude Stein

February 2018 LGBT Events

A ground-breaking American writer, Stein was the most celebrated lesbian author of the early 20th century. Her Paris home became a salon for the leading artists and writers of the period between World Wars I and II. She lived with her lifelong companion, Alice B. Toklas. Stein named her most famous work, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, after her partner.

 

Date Varies* – Christian: Ash Wednesday

Christian Events Feb 2018

This marks the beginning of Lent, a 40-day period of prayer and fasting preceding Easter Sunday. It’s observed in memory of Jesus’ 40 days of fasting in the desert. Many Roman Catholics and Protestants choose to give up a favorite food or activity during Lent. The placing of ashes on the forehead, in the shape of a cross, is part of the preparation for fasting and resistance to temptation.

*for the 2018 date of this and other moveable holidays, see our Online Diversity Calendar

Date Varies – Hindu: Parinirvana or Nirvana Day

Hindu Events Feb 2018

In the Mahãyãna Buddhist tradition, this day marks the death of Buddha in 483 B.C.E. and commemorates his attainment of final Nirvana. The date is based on the Japanese Buddhist calendar.

 

Feb. 15 – Women: Susan B Anthony

Women's Diversity Events FebruaryA leading women’s rights activist, Anthony was a leader of the movement to gain women the right to vote. As co- leader of the Women’s Temperance Movement, she secured the first laws in New York State giving women control over their children, property, and wages.

 

Date Varies – Chinese New Year

Feb 2018 Intercultural CalendarAlso called Spring Festival, this is the beginning of a three-day celebration of the Chinese New Year. The festivities mark the beginning of year 4716 (The Year of the Dog) since the mythical founding of the Chinese people. Celebrations include fireworks, a dragon dance and the beating of drums and cymbals, visits to temples, and prayers for blessings in the new year.

 

Feb. 21 – Black: Barbara Jordan

Feb 2018 Black Diversity EventsIn 1966, Jordan was the first Black woman elected to the Texas State Senate. She later became the first woman and first African American elected to Congress from Texas. Jordan graduated magna cum laude from Texas Southern University and Boston University Law School.

Those are 7 events from our February 2018 Diversity Calendar. To view all 100+ events, moveable dates, and inclusion tips, please see our Online Diversity Calendar.

October 2017 Diversity Calendar

by Logan Arlen

The month of October is widely known for the peak of autumn and Halloween. But our October 2017 Diversity Calendar features celebration of inclusion events, including National Disability Employment Awareness Month, Global Diversity Awareness Month, LGBT History Month, and more.

While these are three major diversity events that span the entire month, there are many more important dates in October. To see what diversity events you missed last month look at the September’s 2017 blog post

Check out the full diversity calendar

National Disability Employment Awareness

National Disability Employment Awareness

Declared by Congress in 1988 in order to raise awareness of the contributions and needs of people with disabilities.  “Smart employers know that including different perspectives in problem-solving situations leads to better solutions,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta when NDEA was established. “Hiring employees with diverse abilities strengthens their business, increases competition and drives innovation.” This sentiment is still true today, now more than ever.

LGBT History Month

LGBT History Month

Another October 2017 diversity month theme is LGBT History Month. A Missouri high-school teacher, Rodney Wilson, first proposed the idea in 1994. Wilson chose October because it’s the anniversary of first and second March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, as well as the month in which National Coming Out Day is honored. LGBT History Month is celebrated in the United States and many countries around the world, but not all of them are in October. View our LGBT training video Anyone Can Be an Ally.

Sukkot

Jewish: Sukkot

Sukkot, or the Feast of Tabernacles, is named after the Sukkah erected and adorned with fruits and vegetables. These symbolize the temporary dwellings farmers lived in during harvest, and the dwellings Israelites lived in during their 40-year journey through the desert. Sukkot is one of the three ‘pilgrimage festivals’ during which Jews must perform a pilgrimage to the holy temple. Each day of the holiday it is required to perform a ceremony in which the Four Species are waved.

Imam W.D. Mohammed

African American/Islam: Imam W.D. Mohammed (born Wallace Dean Muhammad)

Son of the leader of the Nation of Islam, Elijah Muhammad, W.D. succeeded his father and transformed the Nation of Islam to a mainstream Islamic group from a small black separatist organization. W.D. emphasized religious and racial tolerance to his followers and opened his new group to Muslims of all races.

He also disbanded the Nation of Islam’s paramilitary force, renamed temples to “mosques” ministers to “imams”, and abolished the dress code. After several other name changes, Imam settled on the “Muslim American Community” in the 1990s.

United Nations Day

Global Event: United Nations Day

October 24th commemorates the formation of the United Nations in 1945. After the conclusion of World War II, the world banded together to create a council of nations to better the world. Franklin D. Roosevelt coined the term United Nations during WWII to describe the Allied countries at war with the Axis countries. Five of these Allied countries – The United States, United Kingdom, Soviet Union, the Republic of China, and France – became permanent members of the UN’s Security Council, who ratified the charter creating the UN.

Global Diversity Awareness Month

Global Diversity Awareness Month

Our diversity calendar for October 2017 also includes Global Diversity Awareness Month, which promotes open mindedness and celebration of differences. Building an inclusive workplace is key to increasing employee morale and productivity. Inclusion is based on ensuring everyone receives equal treatment, and understanding different cultural perspectives and values. View our global diversity training video Building the Multicultural team.

Be sure to check out next month’s diversity calendar for a preview of November’s events. For a complete list of 2017 events, see our online diversity calendar.

September 2017 Religious Holidays

by Logan Arlen

In part 1 of September 2017 diversity calendar, we covered how Jesse Owens became a hero to the world, Jane Addam’s rise to becoming the first woman to receive a Nobel Peace Prize, and the significance of Hispanic Heritage Month. Check out the full September diversity calendar here

In Part 2, we’ll explore some of the most important September 2017 religious holidays and other diversity events.

September 2017 Religious Holiday Rosh Hashanah

Jewish: Rosh Hashanah (New Year)

A key religious date, it begins at sundown, and marks the Jewish New Year 5777 and the Jewish month of Tishri. Rosh Hashanah is a time of reflection for both the past year and looking forward for the year to come. During the seders during this time, apples are dipped in honey to signify a ‘sweet’ new year. This also a time of forgiveness, to be asked from both God and the people in one’s life in order to live a better life in the upcoming year. A common greetings during the holiday is L’shana Tova, which means “Happy New Year”.

 

September 2017 Religious Dates: Yom KippurJewish : Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur is viewed as the most holy religious holidays of the year in Judaism, much of the observance is spent in prayer and services at synagogue before a celebratory feast at the end of the fasting period. Ten days after Rosh Hashanah, beings Yom Kippur or the Day of Atonement.

Jewish law requires one to eat a large and festive meal on the afternoon before Yom Kippur in order to prepare for the 25-hour fasting period ahead. Fasting on this holy day is symbolizes atonement and repentance, during this time Jews are to remind themselves of their sins and seek forgiveness for their wrongdoings. An appropriate greeting during this holiday would be “Good yuntef.”

September 2017 Religious Events

Celebration of Confucius Death

The vast majority of people in Eastern Asia practice some form of religion in which Confucius is a deity. Thus the People’s Republic of China honors Confucius on the day of his death. Confucius’ philosophy focused on morality, sincerity and justice, and the correctness of social relationships.

He was an advocate for strong loyalty to one’s family as well as respect between husband and wife, and the respect of elders from children. He is perhaps most famous for his saying “Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself”, otherwise know as the Golden Rule. As such he is a deity in Taoism, which places a strong emphasis on living in harmony with the world.


September Blog Post

People with Disabilities : Christopher Reeve (1952-2004)

Distinguished actor best known for his role of Superman, Reeve’s life was forever changed when he suffered a spinal injury during an equestrian competition that left him paralyzed from the neck down.

It was only after a long and arduous effort was he able to regain the ability to speak and breathe. It was then that Reeve became an advocate for research on healing spinal cord injuries. He went on to establish his own research center and foundation to provide grants to local agencies that focus on quality of life for the disabled and raise money for research. Years after his accident he was able to gradually regain sensation parts of his body. Even then he continued his work and became a spokesperson for support for stem cell research.

To see what events you missed last month look in our diversity calendar for August 2017.

 


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