June 2019 Diversity Calendar

June brings the colors of summer, and thus it’s a great time to celebrate a rainbow of diversity. That makes it an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our wonderful differences and similarities.

To help you, here are 7 diversity holidays in June 2019, from our Online Diversity Calendar. These events need respectful scheduling – or just give the chance to shout out to specific diversity groups.

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LGBT Pride Month

On June 11, 1999, President William J. Clinton issued a presidential proclamation designating June as LGBT Pride Month. The date marked the 30th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising and the birth of the modern LGBT civil rights movement. Every year, an International Pride Theme is chosen at the InterPrice Annual Conference. Be sure to view Anyone Can Be an Ally, our most popular LGBT training video.

 

June 2 – United States : Granting of Citizenship to Native Americans (1924)

On this day, Congress extended the rights of citizenship to all Native Americans born in the United States. Previously, only part of the Native American population had been granted citizenship through treaties, statutes, naturalization, and service in the armed forces.

 

June 3 – LGBTQ+ : Anderson Cooper

“I’m gay, always have been, always will be, and I couldn’t be any more happy, comfortable with myself, and proud.”
-Anderson Cooper

Anderson Hays Cooper (June 3, 1967 – ) is an American journalist, television personality, and author. Cooper is openly gay; according to The New York Times, he is ‘the most prominent openly-gay journalist on American television.’ Apple CEO Tim Cook turned to Cooper for advice before he subsequently made the decision to publicly come out as gay.

 

June 9, 2019 – United States : Puerto Rican Day Parade

Since 1958, New York and other major cities have held parades on the second Sunday in June to celebrate the contributions of the Puerto Rican people to history. The parades feature floats, singers, and dancers in colorful costumes. They’re similar to St. Patrick’s Day, Italian, and Polish parades that have been held for decades in cities throughout the country.

June 19 – Black American : Juneteenth

This commemorates the emancipation of all slaves in Texas by the Union general Gordon Grange. As news of the Emancipation Proclamation issued in January moved westward, he announced on this day that, ‘The people of Texas are informed that in accord with a Proclamation of the Executive of the United States all slaves are free . . . .’ This is a time for various celebrations in African-American communities, including speeches, rallies, and displays of art and music. For more information, visit Juneteenth.

 

June 25 – Hispanic American : Sonia Sotomayor

‘In every position that I’ve been in, there have been naysayers who don’t believe I’m qualified or who don’t believe I can do the work. And I feel a special responsibility to prove them wrong.’ 

-Sonia Sotomayor

Sonia Maria Sotomayor (born June 25, 1954) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving since August 2009. She is the Supreme Court’s first justice of Hispanic descent, first Latina and third woman.

June 27 – People with Disabilities : Helen Keller (1880-1968)

“Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content.”

– Helen Keller

Author and educator. Left deaf and blind by illness at the age of 19 months, Helen Keller learned to speak and then to read and write Braille with the help of her remarkable teacher, Annie Sullivan. After graduating cum laude from Radcliffe College in 1904, she devoted her life to writing and social activism, particularly in aid of people with one or both of her disabilities. Her extraordinary achievements made her an international heroine and an inspiration to millions.

To find out about more multicultural events and holidays, check out our July diversity calendar or our diversity holiday calendar for 2019

 

March 2019 Diversity Calendar

March is the advent of spring, and the hope of colorful flowers under a rainbow of diversity. That makes March an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our wonderful differences and similarities.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events and holidays in March 2019 that require respectful scheduling – or just provide an opportunity to shout out and say “we’re different and – together – we are awesome.”

 

March 2019 – Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month is an annual observance of the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. It is celebrated during March in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia, corresponding with International Women’s Day on March 8. The theme for 2019 is “Visionary Women: Champions of Peace & Nonviolence.” This makes March an ideal time to support the #metoo movement and promoting training for sexual harassment prevention.

 

March 1 – Hispanic American/Women: Geisha Williams

Geisha J. Williams (born 1961 or 1962) is an American businesswoman. She became the first female Hispanic CEO of a Fortune 500 company on March 1, 2017, when she became president and CEO of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). Williams was born in Cuba, and emigrated to the U.S. with her family. She joined PG&E in 2007.

 

March 6 – Black American/Muslim : Shaquille O’Neal

March 2019 Diversity Calendar

Shaquille O’Neal Shaquille Rashaun O’Neal (born March 6, 1972), nicknamed ‘Shaq’, is an American retired professional basketball. Widely considered one of the greatest players in NBA history, he is a practicing Muslim. O’Neal was raised by a Baptist mother and a Muslim stepfather. In a 2010 interview he confirmed his plans to undertake the Muslim pilgrimage, called Hajj. Discover more about how religion impacts the workplace.

 

March 6, 2019 – Christian : Ash Wednesday

This marks the beginning of Lent, a 40-day period of prayer and fasting preceding Easter Sunday. It is observed in memory of Jesus’ 40 days of fasting in the desert. In the early centuries of Christianity, there were strict requirements for fasting during the period of preparation for Easter. Although these rules have been relaxed in the Western church, many Roman Catholics and Protestants choose to give up a favorite food or activity during Lent.

 

March 21, 2019 – Hindu : Holi

Multicultural Calendar March 2019

Holi, the festival of colors, celebrates the coming of spring throughout India and the new harvest of the winter crop. It is celebrated over two days. Newly harvested grains, coconuts, and sweets are thrown into the fire as offerings, followed by singing and dancing around the bonfire.

 

March 25 – United Nations : International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

This is a day to honor and remember the more than 15 million men, women and children who were victims of the 400-year transatlantic slave trade, one of the darkest and most tragic chapters in human history. It is also a time to raise awareness about the dangers of racism and prejudice in today’s world.

 

March 26 – Italian American : Nancy Pelosi

Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is an American politician. She was the first woman to become Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, attaining the highest rank of any female politician in U.S. history. She served as the 52nd House Speaker from 2007 to 2011, the only woman to do so. As Speaker, she became the first woman and the first Italian-American to lead a major party in Congress.

To discover more multicultural holidays and events, see our April diversity calendar or our diversity holiday calendar for 2019

November 2018 Diversity Calendar

Our November 2018 Diversity Calendar features a diverse array of multicultural holidays calling for respectful scheduling, as well as opportunities for celebrating awareness and inclusion. Here you’ll find 7 key events in November: for a complete list, see our online diversity calendar.

According to a study by Harvard University, diversity training usually fails unless awareness and inclusion is a daily practice. So be sure to put these events on your work calendar.

 

Native American Heritage Month

Native Americans include hundreds of different tribes, speaking approximately 250 languages. President George H. W. Bush in August 1990 designated November as National American Indian Heritage Month. In his proclamation for 1996, President William J. Clinton noted, “Throughout our history, American Indian and Alaska Native peoples have been an integral part of the American character. Against all odds, America’s first peoples have endured, and they remain a vital cultural, political, social, and moral presence.”

National Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes Awareness Month

National Diabetes Month is observed every November so individuals, health care professionals, organizations, and communities across the country can bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. In the United States, some 29.1 million people – or 9.3% of the population – have diabetes, including 8.1 million people who are undiagnosed.

Movember

Movember is an annual event involving the growing of moustaches during the month of November. This is to raise awareness of men’s health issues, such as prostate cancer, testicular cancer and men’s suicide. Movember aims to increase early cancer detection, diagnosis and effective treatments, and ultimately reduce the number of preventable deaths. Besides annual check-ups, the Movember Foundation encourages men to be aware of family history of cancer and to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

November 1 Mexico : Day of the Dead

November multicultural holidays include this holiday, with roots in two traditions: the Christian observance of All Saints and All Souls Day, and two Aztec festivals honoring the souls of the dead. Flowers, foods, and favorite possessions celebrate the memory of deceased loved ones and to welcome their visiting souls. The holiday is celebrated with family and community gatherings, music, and feasting, and the festivity of its observance acknowledges death as an integral part of life.

November 1 LGBTQ+ : Tim Cook

Tim Cook

A key diversity event for November 2018 is the birthday of Timothy Donald Cook (November 1, 1960 – ), an American business executive, industrial engineer, and developer. In 2014, he became the first Chief Executive of a Fortune 500 company to publicly identify as gay. Cook is the Chief Executive Officer of Apple Inc., previously serving as the company’s Chief Operating Officer, under its founder Steve Jobs.

November 18 – Hispanic American : Roberto Goizueta

Roberto Goizueta

Roberto Críspulo Goizueta Cantera (November 18, 1931 – October 18, 1997) was a Cuban-American businessman, who was the first Hispanic CEO of a Fortune 500 company. Goizueta was Chairman, Director, and Chief Executive Officer of The Coca-Cola Company from August 1980 until his death in 1997. During his tenure, the Coca-Cola brand became the best-known trademark in the world.

November 30 Shirley Chisholm: Black American

Shirley Chisholm

Shirley Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to the U.S. Congress in 1968, where she served seven terms. While in Congress, Chisholm spoke out for civil rights, women’s rights, and the poor, and against the Vietnam War. In 1972 Chisholm became a Democratic candidate for President of the United States, the first major party Black American candidate for the U.S. presidency.

Find out about next month in our December 2018 diversity calendar. And see our online diversity calendar, to find out key diversity events in the coming months, get inclusion tips, and more.

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