October 2019 Diversity Calendar

October heralds the wonderful colors of autumn. That makes October an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our colorful differences and similarities. Indeed, there are three major October diversity month themes below.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events in October 2019. These diversity holidays might respectful scheduling – such as Yom Kippur. Others offer an opportunity to give a shout out to diverse groups, ranging from LGBTQ+ to people with disabilities. Check out our Online Diversity Calendar™ to see all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get inclusion tips for your employees.

October 2019: Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast Cancer Awareness Month, also called National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the USA, is an annual international health campaign. It’s promoted by major breast cancer charities every October, to increase awareness of the disease, and to raise funds for research into its cause, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure. The campaign also offers information and support to those affected by breast cancer.

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Global Diversity Awareness Month

October 2019 Diversity Calendar

Another October diversity event in 2019 is Global Diversity Awareness Month. Global diversity awareness focuses on understanding differing cultural perspectives, and valuing the diverse perspectives of all people from all places. Fueled by the belief that workforce diversity is a major business advantage, global diversity awareness promotes cultural diversity training and an inclusive global environment.

 

National Disability Employment Awareness Month

Designate by President Reagan in 1988, this October diversity month seeks to enhance public awareness of those with disabilities, and encourage their full integration into the workforce. For more information, visit the U.S. Department of Labor National Disability Employment Awareness Month webpage.

 

October 9, 2019 – Jewish : Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement)

October Multicultural Events

A key October multicultural holiday is Yom Kippur. The ten days from Rosh Hashanah to Yom Kippur are known as the Days of Awe or the Days of Repentance. During this time Jews are to remind themselves of their sins, and seek forgiveness for their wrongdoings. Many Jews observe Yom Kippur, the holiest Jewish holiday, by taking no food or water from sundown the day before through sundown the following day. It is also common for Jews not to work the night before or day of Yom Kippur. For more religious holidays, see our 2020 Interfaith Calendar

 

October 10 – People with Disabilities : World Mental Health Day

World Mental Health Day is a day for global mental health education, awareness and advocacy against social stigma. It was first celebrated in 1992 at the initiative of the World Federation for Mental Health. The federation is a global mental health organization with members and contacts in more than 150 countries. Every October 10, advocates promote this annual awareness program to bring attention to mental illness, as well as promote workplace wellness training .

 

October 11 – LGBTQ+ : National Coming Out Day/March on Washington 

The key LGBTQ+ diversity event in October. On this day in 1987, saw the largest gay and lesbian gathering in history, with estimates ranging from 200,000 to 600,000 protestors. The crowd protested anti-gay discrimination, and demanded a stronger government response to the AIDS crisis.

 

October 27, 2019 – Hindu : Diwali

Diversity Holidays October 2019A major October diversity holiday, Diwali is one of the most important annual festivals in the Hindu religion. Lasting five days, Diwali encompasses a variety of festivals, celebrating various gods and goddesses, and events in their lives. Since Diwali is a ‘festival of lights,’ candles are an appropriate gift.

Get a head start, and check out our November 2019 diversity calendar. Or better yet, discover our Online Diversity Calendar™ to see all upcoming 2019/2020 diversity holidays and get inclusion tips for your employees.

September 2019 Diversity Calendar

September bring autumn, and the leaves of change. So it’s a great time to inspire your people to be more aware and respectful of our differences – and similarities.

Here you’ll find our diversity calendar for September 2019, featuring 7 events and multicultural holidays. Some might impact the workplace, while others are a time to celebrate diverse groups. See our Online Diversity Calendar™ to see all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get helpful inclusion tips for your employees.

National Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15-October 15

Leading our September multicultural calendar is National Hispanic Heritage Month. Launched in 1968 as National Hispanic Heritage Week, the celebration includes September 15 and 16, the independence days for Central American nations and Mexico, respectively. In 1988, the period was expanded to National Hispanic Heritage Month.

Each year the National Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers and the Hispanic Foundation select a theme for the month, and commission a poster to reflect that theme. An important part of respecting Hispanics is being aware of communication differences, as explored in this training video on cross cultural communication.

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September 2, 2019 – Hindu : Ganesh Chaturthi

September multicultural diversity
This Hindu festival is a key diversity holiday in Sept. 2019. It’s celebrated in honour of the elephant-headed god, Ganesha, usually in August or September. The festival generally lasts ten days, and is also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi or Vinayaka Chavithi. For more religious holidays, see our 2020 Interfaith Calendar

 

September 16 – Mexico : Independence Day (El Día de Independencia)

On September 16, 1810, in the town of Dolores in the province of Guanajuato, a handful of people were summoned by a parish priest to take up arms against the Spanish colonial government. This began the fight for independence that ended 350 years of Spanish rule. Celebrated by people of Mexican origin throughout the world, this is a day when Mexican Americans often hang Mexican flags at their homes.

 

September 20 – Black American : Ursula Burns

Multicultural Events Sept 2019
‘I’m a black lady from the Lower East Side of New York. Not a lot intimidates me. Believe that there are no limitations, no barriers to your success — you will be empowered and you will achieve.’

-Ursula Burns

Diversity events include the birthdays of diversity leaders, such as Ursula M. Burns (September 20, 1958 – ). Burns is an American business executive, and the first black woman CEO to head a Fortune 500 company. In 2014, Forbes rated her the 22nd most powerful woman in the world.

 

September 20 – Women : HeForShe

HeForShe is a solidarity campaign for the advancement of gender equality, initiated by the United Nations. Founded on September 20th, 2014, it’s backed by a number of celebrities, notably actress Emma Watson.

Its goal is to achieve equality by encouraging all genders as agents of change and take action against negative stereotypes and behaviors, faced by people with feminine personalities/genders. Sexual harassment prevention training is key to gender equality.

 

September 25 – People with Disabilities : Christopher Reeve (1952-2004)

Christopher Reeve was an actor, including starring in the hist Superman, as well as acting in 17 feature films, a dozen TV movies, and more than 150 plays. His career was cut short after an equestrian accident. Reeve landed head first, fracturing the uppermost vertebrae in his spine, instantly paralyzing him from the neck down. After a grueling effort to regain his ability to breathe and speak, Reeve became an advocate for research on healing spinal cord injuries. He became Chairman of the American Paralysis Association and Vice Chairman of the National Organization on Disability. He also became a national spokesperson for and raised funds in support of stem cell research.

 

September 30, 2019 – Jewish : Rosh Hashanah (New Year) (9/30-10/1)

September multicultural holidays

Rounding out our September 2019 diversity calendar is Rosh Hashanah. Like most Jewish holidays, it begins at sundown the evening before the first (full) day of the holiday. Rosh Hashanah signifies the beginning of the Days of Awe, a period of serious reflection about the past year and the year to come. This period, which continues until Yom Kippur, is a time for asking forgiveness from both God and other people, and committing oneself to live a better life in the year to come.

To find out more multicultural holidays and events, see our Online Diversity Calendar™ to enjoy all upcoming 2019 diversity holidays and get helpful inclusion tips for your employees.

August 2019 Diversity Calendar

 

August 4, 2019 – Black American : Barack Obama

“The world respects us not just for our arsenal; it respects us for our diversity and our openness and the way we respect every faith.” -Barack Obama

Barack Hussein Obama II (1961- ) is an American politician who served as the 44th President of the United States from 2009 to 2017. He was the first Black American to assume the presidency. Obama promoted inclusiveness for LGBT Americans. His administration filed briefs that urged the Supreme Court to strike down same-sex marriage bans as unconstitutional (United States v. Windsor and Obergefell v. Hodges). Obama left office in January 2017 with a 60% approval rating and currently resides in Washington, D.C.

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August 9, 2019 – United Nations : International Day of the World’s Indigenous People

First proclaimed by the U.N. General Assembly in 1994, this is a day to celebrate the unique cultures of indigenous peoples around the world.

 

August 10, 2019 – Islamic : The Hajj (8/10-8/14)

The Hajj is the annual pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia. All Muslims who are able are required to make the pilgrimage at least once in their lifetime. The Hajj is a time for reflection and celebration, when more than two million Muslims from around the world gather together to celebrate their faith. The culmination of the Hajj is the three-day festival of Eid al-Adha (The Feast of Sacrifice), the most important feast of the Muslim calendar.

 

August 24, 2019 – People with Disabilities : Marlee Matlin

‘It was ability that mattered, not disability, which is a word I’m not crazy about using.’ -Marlee Matlin

Marlee Beth Matlin (born August 24, 1965) is an American actress, author and activist. She won the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for Children of a Lesser God, to date the only deaf performer to have won the award. Matlin is a prominent member of the National Association of the Deaf. In recognition of her philanthropic work and her advocacy for the inclusion of people with disabilities, Matlin received the 2016 Morton E. Ruderman Award in Inclusion, given to one individual whose work excels at promoting disability inclusion.

 

August 26, 2019 – Italian American : Geraldine Ferraro (1935-2011)

Lawyer and politician. Ferraro was the first woman and the first Italian American to run on a major party national ticket. In 1984, she ran as Walter Mondale’s vice presidential running mate on the Democratic Party ticket in the presidential election. She served as the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights under the Clinton Administration. Ferraro was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1994.

 

August 26, 2019 – United States : Women’s Equality Day

A law passed by Congress in 1974 sets this day aside to mark the certification in 1920 of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution. The 19th Amendment prohibits discrimination in voting based on gender.

 

August 31, 2019 – Islamic : Islamic New Year (Hijri)

This begins the first day of Muharram of the new year 1441 based on the Islamic lunar calendar. Recognizing the festival/holiday: any sweet dessert is an appropriate gift. Muslims do not drink alcoholic beverages.

Enjoy a head start on next month, when you view our September 2019 Diversity Calendar. 

 

July 2019 Diversity Calendar

July is the peak of summer, and thus a great time for a sunny celebration of diversity. That makes July a wonderful time to be more aware – and appreciative – of our wonderful differences and similarities.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events and holidays in July 2019, from our Online Diversity Calendar. These provide a terrific opportunity to say “we’re different and – together – we are awesome.”

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July 2 – Black American : Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993)

Civil rights leader and Supreme Court justice. Marshall was head of the legal services division of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People from 1938 to 1962.  He thus led the legal effort to advance the civil rights of all Americans, particularly those belonging to minority groups. His most famous victory was the 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, which ended racial segregation in public schools.

 

July 6 – Mexican : Frida Kahlo (1907-1954)

Painter. Kahlo was born in the outskirts of Mexico City three years before the beginning of the Mexican Revolution. She was one of the most individualistic painters of the first half of the twentieth century. Known for her distinctive self-portraits filled with rich colors and symbolic imagery, Kahlo expressed in form and color her innermost feelings and states of mind.

 

July 6 – Tibetan : 14th Dalai Lama (1935 – )

The 14th Dalai Lama, born 6 July 1935, is the current Dalai Lama. He assumed full temporal (political) duties on 17 November 1950, at the age of 15, after the People’s Republic of China’s invasion of Tibet. During the 1959 Tibetan uprising, the Dalai Lama fled to India, where he currently lives as a refugee. The 14th Dalai Lama received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. He has traveled the world and spoken about many topics. Although in exile from his home in Tibet, he remains a prominent political figure for the people of Tibet.

 

July 14, 2019 – France : Bastille Day

This celebrates the fall of the Bastille prison, marking the beginning of the French Revolution in 1789. The revolution led to the end of monarchial rule and the creation of a French Republic. Given their French heritage, many Louisiana ‘parishes,’ hold Bastille Day festivals featuring Cajun food, music, and dance. These include New Orleans and Kaplan, sometimes called ‘the most Cajun place on earth.’

 

July 18 – United Nations : Nelson Mandela International Day

In November 2009, the United Nations General Assembly declared Nelson Mandela’s birthday, July 18, to be Nelson Mandela International Day. The UN made the declaration, in recognition of his humanitarian achievements, and his contribution to racial reconciliation, democracy, and peace throughout the world.

 

July 20 – People with Disabilities: First Special Olympics Games (1968)

On this date in 1968, the first Special Olympics opened at Soldier Field in Chicago. Founded by Eunice Kennedy Shriver, it’s an athletic competition for children and adults with cognitive disabilities.  The competitions are held every two years, alternating between summer and winter games. The World Summer Games are held in the year before the regular Olympics. For more information, see our disability awareness training videos.

 

July 26 – People with Disabilities: Americans with Disabilities Act (1990)

Signed into law on this date, the ADA is a milestone of U.S. civil rights legislation. It protects people with disabilities from discrimination in the areas of employment, transportation, and public accommodation. The law requires a wide range of public and private establishments to make new and renovated facilities accessible to people with disabilities, and ‘readily achievable’ changes to existing facilities in order to increase accessibility.

To find out about more multicultural events and holidays, check out our August diversity calendar or our diversity holiday calendar for 2019

 

 

June 2019 Diversity Calendar

June brings the colors of summer, and thus it’s a great time to celebrate a rainbow of diversity. That makes it an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our wonderful differences and similarities.

To help you, here are 7 diversity holidays in June 2019, from our Online Diversity Calendar. These events need respectful scheduling – or just give the chance to shout out to specific diversity groups.

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LGBT Pride Month

On June 11, 1999, President William J. Clinton issued a presidential proclamation designating June as LGBT Pride Month. The date marked the 30th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising and the birth of the modern LGBT civil rights movement. Every year, an International Pride Theme is chosen at the InterPrice Annual Conference. Be sure to view Anyone Can Be an Ally, our most popular LGBT training video.

 

June 2 – United States : Granting of Citizenship to Native Americans (1924)

On this day, Congress extended the rights of citizenship to all Native Americans born in the United States. Previously, only part of the Native American population had been granted citizenship through treaties, statutes, naturalization, and service in the armed forces.

 

June 3 – LGBTQ+ : Anderson Cooper

“I’m gay, always have been, always will be, and I couldn’t be any more happy, comfortable with myself, and proud.”
-Anderson Cooper

Anderson Hays Cooper (June 3, 1967 – ) is an American journalist, television personality, and author. Cooper is openly gay; according to The New York Times, he is ‘the most prominent openly-gay journalist on American television.’ Apple CEO Tim Cook turned to Cooper for advice before he subsequently made the decision to publicly come out as gay.

 

June 9, 2019 – United States : Puerto Rican Day Parade

Since 1958, New York and other major cities have held parades on the second Sunday in June to celebrate the contributions of the Puerto Rican people to history. The parades feature floats, singers, and dancers in colorful costumes. They’re similar to St. Patrick’s Day, Italian, and Polish parades that have been held for decades in cities throughout the country.

June 19 – Black American : Juneteenth

This commemorates the emancipation of all slaves in Texas by the Union general Gordon Grange. As news of the Emancipation Proclamation issued in January moved westward, he announced on this day that, ‘The people of Texas are informed that in accord with a Proclamation of the Executive of the United States all slaves are free . . . .’ This is a time for various celebrations in African-American communities, including speeches, rallies, and displays of art and music. For more information, visit Juneteenth.

 

June 25 – Hispanic American : Sonia Sotomayor

‘In every position that I’ve been in, there have been naysayers who don’t believe I’m qualified or who don’t believe I can do the work. And I feel a special responsibility to prove them wrong.’ 

-Sonia Sotomayor

Sonia Maria Sotomayor (born June 25, 1954) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving since August 2009. She is the Supreme Court’s first justice of Hispanic descent, first Latina and third woman.

June 27 – People with Disabilities : Helen Keller (1880-1968)

“Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content.”

– Helen Keller

Author and educator. Left deaf and blind by illness at the age of 19 months, Helen Keller learned to speak and then to read and write Braille with the help of her remarkable teacher, Annie Sullivan. After graduating cum laude from Radcliffe College in 1904, she devoted her life to writing and social activism, particularly in aid of people with one or both of her disabilities. Her extraordinary achievements made her an international heroine and an inspiration to millions.

To find out about more multicultural events and holidays, check out our July diversity calendar or our diversity holiday calendar for 2019

 

May 2019 Diversity Calendar

May is a time of warmth, and thus a great time to have greater awareness – and appreciation – of diversity at home and worldwide.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events and diversity holidays in May 2019. Some – such as Ramadan – require respectful scheduling, while others are simply provide a great opportunity to celebrate specific diversity groups and say – we appreciate and include you!

 

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Mental Health Awareness Month

May 2019 Diversity Calendar

Our May 2019 diversity calendar features 4 month-long themes, including Mental Health Awareness Month. Also referred to as Mental Health Month, it’s been observed in May in the United States since 1949. The campaign reaches millions of people in the United States through the media, local events, and screenings. To promote mental health in your workplace, check out our workplace wellness videos.

 

Older Americans Month

Older Americans Month was established by presidential proclamation to honor the contributions of older Americans to society. For more information, visit the Older Americans Month website

 

Jewish American Heritage Month

Multicultural Events Calendar

May multicultural events include Jewish American Heritage Month. On April 20, 2006, President George W. Bush issued a presidential proclamation designating this annual theme. In his proclamation, the president said, ‘During Jewish American Heritage Month, we celebrate the rich history of the Jewish people in America and honor the great contributions they have made to our country. As a nation of immigrants, the United States is better and stronger because Jewish people from all over the world have chosen to become American citizens.”

 

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month began in 1979 as Asian Heritage Week, established by congressional proclamation. On October 23, 1992, President George H. W. Bush signed legislation into law that made May of each year Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month.

 

May 4 – LGBTQ+ : Keith Haring (1959-1990)

Diversity Holidays in May

Pop artist. Haring created a wide variety of public art, such as subway drawings of animals and human images and murals. His work ranged from the first mural in a school yard on New York City’s Lower East Side, to a mural on the Berlin Wall. Haring also created designs for performances and for Swatch watches. In 1987, he used his art to support campaigns for AIDS awareness and created the Keith Haring Foundation to contribute to a wide variety of social concerns. To boost LGBTQ+ inclusion in your workplace, check out the Anyone Can Be an Ally video.

 

May 6, 2019 – Islamic : Ramadan (5/6-6/4)

One of the key diversity holidays for May 2019. This begins the first day of the Islamic month of Ramadan, a month of fasting and the holiest month of the Muslim year. The fast of Ramadan is one of the Five Pillars of Islam, and mandatory for every Muslim who has reached puberty except those who are ill, pregnant, or on a journey. During this month, no water or food may be taken from sunrise to sunset. Before inviting someone to lunch or hosting a meal, check to see whether the invitee is observing the fast for this period. To see all upcoming religious holidays, see our online diversity calendar.

 

May 13 – Black American : Stevie Wonder

Stevland Hardaway Morris (born Stevland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950) is better known by his stage name, Stevie Wonder. One of the most critically and commercially successful musicians of the late 20th century, he’s been blind since shortly after birth. Wonder has sold more than 100 million records worldwide. He has recorded more than 30 U.S. top ten hits and received 25 Grammy Awards, one of the most-awarded male solo artists.

To see a list of key events for the entire year, see our 2019 diversity holidays calendar

April 2019 Diversity Calendar

For the most current events, see our April 2020 Diversity Calendar

April is a time when many traditions celebrate spring, and also features Celebrate Diversity Month. So April is a great time to inspire your employees and students to be more aware – and appreciative – of our differences and similarities.

Below you’ll find 7 multicultural events and diversity holidays in April 2019. Some events might impact work schedules; others simply provide a great opportunity to celebrate specific diversity groups. For a complete list, see our interactive online diversity calendar.

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April, 2019 – Celebrate Diversity Month

Launched in 2004, Celebrate Diversity Month is featured each April to recognize and honor the nation’s diversity. Celebrate diversity – and boost awareness and inclusion – with our online diversity training!

The purpose is to help people from all walks of life gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of each other. From Allstate to TIAA, from the US Army to US Postal Service, Celebrate Diversity Month is widely recognized and celebrated by leading workplaces nationwide. This multicultural diversity event is not yet a federally-recognized theme month. 

 

April 1 – LGBTQ+ : Rachel Maddow

Diversity Events Calendar April

Rachel Anne Maddow (born April 1, 1973) is an American television host, liberal political commentator and author. Maddow became the first openly gay anchor to host a major prime-time news program in the United States.

 

April 4 – Black American : Maya Angelou (1928-2014)

Poet, writer, civil rights activist. Maya Angelou was a Renaissance woman whose versatility was reflected in the many roles she excelled in during her lifetime: poet, writer, journalist, actress, dancer, singer, educator, director, producer and civil rights activist. Maya Angelou received the country’s highest civilian honor when President Barack Obama named her a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2010.

 

April 8, 2019 – Buddhist : Buddha’s Birth

Siddhartha Gautama, who became known as Buddha or ‘enlightened one,’ was an Indian prince who left his family at the age of 29 to seek the truth of life. After years of wandering, meditation, and self-denial, he attained the enlightenment he sought at a place now called Buddha Gaya or Bodh Gaya. The religion he founded spread throughout central and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and Korea, and has also attracted followers in the West. Find out more about how religion impacts the workplace.

 

April 20, 2019 – Jewish : Passover (first day of 8-day observance)

April Diversity Calendar

Observed for eight days, this holiday celebrates the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt. The celebration of Passover, a spring festival commemorating freedom and new life, begins the previous evening with a Seder, a meal during which the story of Passover is read from the Haggadah. Jews observing the holiday abstain from eating any foods with leavening, such as bread, cake, and donuts. Before arranging any event involving food, check to see if invitees are following a special Passover diet.

 

April 21, 2019 – Christian : Easter

This religious holiday celebrates the resurrection of Jesus after he was crucified and died in Jerusalem. Jesus’ suffering and death on the cross, followed by his resurrection, is central to Christian faith. Easter is a joyous holiday, since it marks for Christians the fulfillment of the Biblical prophecy of the coming of the Messiah. In addition to its religious significance, Easter is also celebrated as a spring holiday with themes of rebirth, gathering with family and friends, and sharing special foods.

 

April 26, 2019 – Native American : Gathering of Nations Powwow

This three-day multicultural event, held annually at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, is the largest powwow in North America. More than 500 tribes from Canada and the United States participate in this annual celebration of American Indian culture. It features drum groups and ceremonial singing, chanting, dancing in traditional dress, and more. The Gathering of Nations organization seeks to promote the traditions and culture of the American Indian people in the most positive manner possible, and dispel stereotypes created about Native Americans.

Get a head start on next month, with our May 2020 Diversity Calendar. To discover more multicultural holidays and events, see our 2020 Diversity Calendar.

 

March 2019 Diversity Calendar

March is the advent of spring, and the hope of colorful flowers under a rainbow of diversity. That makes March an ideal time to better see – and appreciate – our wonderful differences and similarities.

To help you, here are 7 multicultural events and holidays in March 2019 that require respectful scheduling – or just provide an opportunity to shout out and say “we’re different and – together – we are awesome.”

 

March 2019 – Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month is an annual observance of the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. It is celebrated during March in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia, corresponding with International Women’s Day on March 8. The theme for 2019 is “Visionary Women: Champions of Peace & Nonviolence.” This makes March an ideal time to support the #metoo movement and promoting training for sexual harassment prevention.

 

March 1 – Hispanic American/Women: Geisha Williams

Geisha J. Williams (born 1961 or 1962) is an American businesswoman. She became the first female Hispanic CEO of a Fortune 500 company on March 1, 2017, when she became president and CEO of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). Williams was born in Cuba, and emigrated to the U.S. with her family. She joined PG&E in 2007.

 

March 6 – Black American/Muslim : Shaquille O’Neal

March 2019 Diversity Calendar

Shaquille O’Neal Shaquille Rashaun O’Neal (born March 6, 1972), nicknamed ‘Shaq’, is an American retired professional basketball. Widely considered one of the greatest players in NBA history, he is a practicing Muslim. O’Neal was raised by a Baptist mother and a Muslim stepfather. In a 2010 interview he confirmed his plans to undertake the Muslim pilgrimage, called Hajj. Discover more about how religion impacts the workplace.

 

March 6, 2019 – Christian : Ash Wednesday

This marks the beginning of Lent, a 40-day period of prayer and fasting preceding Easter Sunday. It is observed in memory of Jesus’ 40 days of fasting in the desert. In the early centuries of Christianity, there were strict requirements for fasting during the period of preparation for Easter. Although these rules have been relaxed in the Western church, many Roman Catholics and Protestants choose to give up a favorite food or activity during Lent.

 

March 21, 2019 – Hindu : Holi

Multicultural Calendar March 2019

Holi, the festival of colors, celebrates the coming of spring throughout India and the new harvest of the winter crop. It is celebrated over two days. Newly harvested grains, coconuts, and sweets are thrown into the fire as offerings, followed by singing and dancing around the bonfire.

 

March 25 – United Nations : International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

This is a day to honor and remember the more than 15 million men, women and children who were victims of the 400-year transatlantic slave trade, one of the darkest and most tragic chapters in human history. It is also a time to raise awareness about the dangers of racism and prejudice in today’s world.

 

March 26 – Italian American : Nancy Pelosi

Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is an American politician. She was the first woman to become Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, attaining the highest rank of any female politician in U.S. history. She served as the 52nd House Speaker from 2007 to 2011, the only woman to do so. As Speaker, she became the first woman and the first Italian-American to lead a major party in Congress.

To discover more multicultural holidays and events, see our April diversity calendar or our diversity holiday calendar for 2019

How to Make Diversity Training Work and Create Effective Inclusion

Harvard University Professor Frank Dobbin published a controversial article in 2016 – Why Diversity Programs Fail – that boldly concluded diversity training generally doesn’t work.

This article shook the confidence of many in the diversity and inclusion profession. Even worse, it came just before an era, when the world needs awareness and inclusion more than ever.

But the good news is, buried in the research – and in other articles like it – is a simple formula on how to make diversity training work.

 

The Key to Effective Diversity Training: Daily Practice

Diversity Everyday Practice

Dobbin’s research concludes it’s unrealistic to believe an annual two-hour training session – on its own – will improve behavior. It’s more effective for organizations to demonstrate their commitment to diversity, as part of an everyday practice.

Effective diversity training must be part of related efforts, emphasizing anti-bias training throughout the year, wrote Katerina Bezrukova. She’s co-author of a diversity training study in Psychological Bulletin, and an associate professor at the University of Buffalo’s School of Management.

Shane Green, author of Culture Hacker, concludes: “Like all training, bias and diversity training cannot be a once-a-year event that ticks the box for corporate compliance. For training to be effective, the message must be reinforced regularly.”

 

How: Put Diversity on Your Calendar

Diversity Calendar

Perhaps the best way to make awareness and inclusion part of your daily workplace, is to leverage a calendar. This can be done by getting a diversity calendar – electronic or print – or by adding some key events to your company Outlook.

Here are some ways to use a calendar to instill awareness & inclusion:

1. Monthly Themes – there are dozens of monthly diversity heritage themes throughout the year. These include Black History Month, Women’s History Month, LGBT Pride Month and more. These provide great opportunities to shout out to these diversity groups.

2. Religious Events – most people identify with some religion. Many religious holidays affect the workplace, and require respectful time off from work. These include Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist holidays. In the United States, Christianity is by far the most widely-practiced religion, so be sure to not take Christian holidays for granted.

3. Notable Birthdays – our nation celebrates the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. But what about living diversity pioneers, such as Barack Obama (first Black president), Hillary Clinton (first female major-party nominee for US President) Tim Cook (first openly-LGBTQ+ Fortune 500 CEO), Roberto Goizueta (first Hispanic Fortune 500 CEO), etc.

To make diversity and inclusion real, use these calendar events as opportunities for learning about inclusion. If it’s LGBT Pride Month, for example, provide tips on do’s and dont’s with LGBT co-workers and customers.

Students do best when they learn a little bit every day, rather than cramming the night before exams. It’s the same, with how to make diversity training effective and work. A steady stream is the best way to instill awareness and inclusion, avoid the high cost of discrimination and harassment, and profit from our vibrantly diverse society.

What about you? How do you instill awareness and inclusion – on a daily basis?

December 2018 Diversity Calendar

According to a study by Harvard University, diversity training usually fails unless awareness and inclusion is a daily practice.

Our December 2018 Diversity Calendar features a diverse array of multicultural holidays calling for respectful scheduling, as well as opportunities for celebrating awareness and inclusion. Here you’ll find 7 key events in December: for a complete list, see our online diversity calendar.

International : World AIDS Day

Also known as United Nations World AIDS Day, this day has been declared by the World Health Organization as a time to increase education and awareness of AIDS.

Jewish : Hanukkah (12/2-12/10)

A key December diversity holiday is Hanukkah. Often misunderstood as the “Jewish Christmas” since it occurs in December, it commemorates the victory of the Jewish people over the Syrian Greeks in 165 B.C.E. This victory marked the end of a three-year period of religious persecution, restored Jewish independence, and ensured the survival of monotheism (belief in one God). Hanukkah is celebrated by lighting a candle on each of the eight days of celebration. This ceremony has given the holiday the additional name of “Festival of Lights.” Hanukkah is joyfully celebrated.

United Nations : International Day of Persons with Disabilities

One of the most important diversity events in December 2018. This international observance was established to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights, and well-being of persons with disabilities. It also seeks to foster awareness of the importance of integrating persons with disabilities into every aspect of life.

Buddhist : Bodhi Day (Buddha’s Enlightenment)

Among Mahãyãna Buddhists, this holiday celebrates Buddha’s attaining understanding of the truth of existence, freeing himself from all human suffering, and finding perfect happiness. The date is based on the Japanese Buddhist calendar.

Mexico : Las Posadas (12/16-12/24)

Las Posadas, celebrated from December 16 to December 24, commemorates Mary and Joseph’s effort to find an inn, and the events associated with the birth of Jesus. The holiday takes its name from the Spanish word posadas, meaning “a dwelling.” A candlelight procession represents the star in heaven that guided the three wise men on their way. After a religious ceremony on December 24, there is a traditional celebration centering on the piñata, a decorated clay container filled with toys and candy. When the piñata is broken, the children scramble for the candy.

Christian : Christmas

Most Christians observe Christmas to celebrate the birth of Jesus, and it is celebrated as a public holiday in many countries worldwide. Christmas is a family-oriented holiday with special foods, colorful decorations, and exchanging of gifts. Families often have their own traditions, especially concerning when gifts are exchanged and what foods are served. Jehovah’s Witnesses are among those who do not celebrate this holiday.

African American, African Heritage : Kwanzaa

Another essential multicultural holiday for December is Kwanzaa. First celebrated on December 26, 1966, the festival was created in the United States by scholar and cultural activist Dr. Maulana Karenga. Patterned after harvest festivals in Africa, Kwanzaa derives its name from the Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, meaning “first fruits.” Kwanzaa decorations traditionally use a color scheme of red, black, and green.  A Pan-African holiday, Kwanzaa is also celebrated in Africa, the Caribbean, South America, and in African communities in Europe.

These are just 7 highlights from our December 2018 diversity calendar. See our online diversity calendar, to find out key diversity events in the coming months, get inclusion tips, and more.

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